Remembering 25 years ago: Lynn Valley Little League at the World Series

In 1993 a team of 14 boys from Lynn Valley – just ages 12 and 13 – made their way to Williamsport, Pennsylvania to represent Canada at the Little League World Championship.


A milestone 25 years later


This is was a first for a North Shore team and has not been matched since. It was also a first in Little League history because it was first team helmed by a woman to qualify – a moment so important Coach Kathy Barnard’s Canada hat hangs in the Little League Museum.

The run has been documented in an engaging post by North Vancouver’s Len Corben to celebrate the 20th anniversary. Today, for the 25th anniversary we caught up with player Scott Carlson.

“It was a once in a lifetime sort of thing,” said Carlson, now a investment advisor. “We were playing in Lynn Valley and then provincials and then a couple of weeks later grown men were asking for our 12-year-olds’ autographs in Williamsport. I didn’t even know there was a world series until after nationals.”

The 1993 Lynn Valley Little League all-star team at the Little League World Series. Scott Carlson is back row, second from left.


Local and international history


It was a whirlwind summer for those selected as 11/12 all-stars. They had to win regionals, provincials, turn 12 and 13, head out to Nova Scotia for nationals and after a hard-fought victory head down to Pennsylvania – just three days later – for the World Series.

“Personally I found the Canadian championships more stressful – we were playing to be the best in our country,” said Carlson. “The world series was extremely fun – and extremely competitive. But we got to spend a lot time with the other teams. There was lots of fun to be had. It wasn’t just ballpark – hotel – ballpark.”

The team from LV received special attention from media upon their arrival. Coach Barnard’s glass ceiling-breaking achievement created quite a buzz around the tournament.

“She was the coach of [my regular-season team] the Pirates and her son Spencer was my best friend. They lived three doors up from me,” said Carlson. “She was always there – a great coach.”


Memory of a lifetime


Scott Carlson

Barnard’s milestone, along with the entire team’s journey wasn’t something that hit home until later years later.

“I don’t think I realized how big it was until I was in my 20s when ESPN and TSN started showing all the [Little League World Series] games on TV,” said Carlson.

Now a North Shore dad in his own right, Carlson looks a back – a bit astonished that it has been 25 years.

“It doesn’t feel like yesterday, but it is the most vivid memories I have. It is really hard to reach that level of play – the world championship. It was such a unique experience,” he said. “It is great to sit back and think about it – and to dream of being on of the boys of summer again – just playing baseball.”

North Van Museum wants YOU!

As you are probably already aware, the historic Lynn Valley Elementary School building was preserved and transformed into the North Vancouver Community History Centre, part of the North Vancouver Museum and Archives. The Community History Centre currently has a Canada 150 display, and its second-floor archives are open to the public from Thursday through Saturday (other times by appointment); it’s well worth a visit to look through our community’s collective “photo albums.”  

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North Vancouver Archives offer great gifts for Christmas

The North Vancouver Archives are not the first place you would think to go to find a special present for a special person at Christmas. The kind of present you wouldn’t find for sale anywhere else, for that person who has everything. In fact, most people don’t even know where the Archives are located, or even what the staff does there.

Head north of the intersection of Mountain Highway and Lynn Valley Road (that’s along Lynn Valley Road toward the mountains, for those of us who are directionally challenged!) A block later, turn left at Institute Road. The Community History Centre is found immediately to your left at 3203 Institute Road in the old stone Lynn Valley Elementary School. The ground floor holds offices for the North Vancouver Museum and Archives; the museum itself is currently located at Presentation House at 209 West 4th  and will soon  move into a purpose-built new space near the waterfront. The North Vancouver Archives are on the top floor of the Community History Centre.

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Earthquake hit Lynn Valley 70 years ago today

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Earthquakes have been an ongoing concern in these parts for a very long time – here’s an account of a major earthquake that hit these shores 70 years ago today, from the diary of Winnifred Kate Walton.

Winnifred was born in England in 1888 and travelled to British Columbia in April 1912.  She had a number of homes in Lynn Valley, and in the 1940s and ’50s operated a ladies’ wear shop here as well, first in the Brier Block then across the street in the Fromme Block, now home to the TD Bank and Waves coffee house. Winnifred passed away in Lynn Valley in 1983. Thank you to her granddaughter, Dianne Elphinstone, for providing us with occasional excerpts from “Granny’s Diary.”

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Lynn Valley Day brings back memories

Thank you to Dianne Elphinstone for sharing some of her Lynn Valley Day memories and photos! Volunteer or attend this year’s community celebration on the weekend of June 17 to 19; check out all the details here.

In the early 1940s someone displayed fridges at Lynn Valley Day. Most people did not have one, or also had never seen one. Someone else had a live caged anteater; this would have been about 1945.

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Take a “Jane’s Walk” and hear Lynn Valley history

Jane’s Walks are coming to Lynn Valley,  just in time to celebrate the 100th birthday of the person after whom they were named.

Writer and activist Jane Jacobs had a significant influence on urban planning in the 1960s, when she introduced concepts such as “social capital” in designing communities that better served the overall needs of their residents.

LV Rd by Ross Rd c 1920s NVMA

Lynn Valley Road by Ross Road, circa 1920s. Courtesy of NV Museum & Archives.

Today, Jane’s Walks are free, citizen-led walking tours, in which people get together to explore, talk about, and celebrate their neighbourhoods. On Saturday, May 7, North Vancouver Museum and Archives Curator Karen Dearlove will lead a tour of Lynn Valley, which will be illustrated by historical facts, anecdotes, and historical images, many pertaining to the neighbourhood’s history as a logging and shingle-building community.

The tour will begin at the Community History Centre located in the former Lynn Valley school building at 3203 Institute Road. The tour will begin at 10:30 a.m. and last approximately one hour.

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1962 Lynn Valley Day May Queen remembers crowning glory

From Lynn O’Malley, Voice of the Valley

She may have accomplished many things in her life since, but chief among Jane Jessop’s memories is being crowned May Queen at the 1962 Lynn Valley Day. And it wasn’t just any Lynn Valley Day – they really put on the Ritz as it was the 50th anniversary of the first Lynn Valley Day that took place in 1912 in Lynn Canyon Park.

It wasn’t Jane’s first Lynn Valley Day, though. Then Jane Hambleton, she had been one of the May Queen’s flower girls when she was just in Grade 1. But that was nothing compared to being chosen by popular vote from amongst four or five other Lynn Valley Elementary School girls to be the May Queen in Grade 6.

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Mom won in a walk: a Lynn Valley Day memory

By contributing writer Len Corben

My mother’s Achilles heel was actually her most valuable asset. At least it was on the afternoon she entered the Lynn Valley Day walking race from 15th Street and Lonsdale Avenue to Lynn Valley Park on June 1, 1957, coming up 58 years ago now.

With this year’s Lynn Valley Day scheduled for Saturday, May 30, this is the perfect opportunity to tell the tale of my mom’s victory using a rather unorthodox finishing kick.

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Granddaughter offers glimpse into Lynn Valley Day history

Thanks to our internet-connected world, a little piece of Lynn Valley history recently came to light.

Kim Wertenberger of Wapato, Washington, sent LynnValleyLife a photo of a much-cherished trophy that once belonged to her grandfather, Brian J. Ingoldsby. “I love it dearly and wanted to share it with you,” wrote Kim, who had unsuccessfully tried to make contact with someone in Lynn Valley years ago. This time, her internet search found an appreciative audience in the LVLife editorial office.

Image 4The trophy was given to Mr. Ingoldsby for winning the “Mile Flat Race” in 1921, 22, and 23. The race was run at the first-ever Lynn Valley Day in 1912, and again in 1913, but there is a significant gap in the dates while World War One interrupted such idyllic pastimes. (For a first-hand account of another Lynn Valley man’s experience of this period, see Walter Draycott’s online chronicle of The Great War.) It must have been celebratory indeed when Mr. Ingoldsby won the race when it made its reappearance in 1921.

Says Kim: “I was told that [my grandfather] qualified for the Olympics as a runner, but was spiked by another runner’s shoe so couldn’t participate.  I’m not sure about the truth in that or even if I am remembering the story correctly…but he won this trophy three years in a row so he must have had some skill!”

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Lynn Valley loses loved Legionnaire

 

Received on March 12 from the Lynn Valley Legion. 

Comrade Harold Finnegan, a beloved member of Branch #114 and Veteran of the Korean War, passed away this week.  A Celebration of  Harold’s remarkable life will be held at Branch #114 this Saturday [March 14].  Please join us for a Full Legion Ceremony and service for family, friends and Comrades beginning at 11:00 a.m. A reception will follow at the Branch.

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