Meet the candidates: ZoAnn Morten

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


I have a passion for the North Shore and all the residents who it home. I believe in advocating for the people and standing up for their concerns, needs and demands. I am honest, trustworthy, dedicated, and I’m here to listen and represent for all residents.


Why should the public give you their vote?


After 30 years of volunteering in programs and projects for the benefit of North Vancouver people and the environment, I feel I have gained the understanding of our community and our local government. I would like to take my knowledge of policy writing and implementation to form our policy and regulations so they have purpose, are easy to understand and have reason to them.  I hear “we are losing our quality of life” I feel this is a term we should grapple with, to understand fully and then work towards having Quality of Life across our District.


What issues do you want to focus on?


I would like to step back so we can  monitor what is “in the works” what are we building? Do we have the infrastructure to support what is coming? (roads, hospitals, classrooms, sewage and water pipes…) are we missing pieces? What are the needs of current residents and what are the needs of those who are arriving? We have time to get this right IF we want to get it right.

The lane being built on the north side of Lynn Creek bridge took 22 years that I know of,  from talking of it,  to construction. We best start talking now as to what our future needs are.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


Lynn Valley is my home. When I start to write, a travelogue comes out “A community nestled at the foot of the mountains with clean freshwater streams tumbling over rocks and logs, in our back yards and parks.” My priority for Lynn Valley is that we are able to Be Community, that we recognize our neighbourhoods and our neighbours. That we are able to find rest in our homes, parks and common spaces. Living with Nature.

ZoAnnMorten.ca

www.facebook.com/VoteZoAnnDNV

Meet the candidates: Betty Forbes

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


I am a fourth generation North Vancouverite and a life-long volunteer on many committees, including the OCP Implementation Monitoring Committee.  I attend Council meetings, workshops, and Open Hearings.  In this last term of Council I have seen that the communities questions, presentations, voices are not being heard.  I want to take the communities voices to the decision table and ensure that they are heard, discussed and Council’s decisions are transparent.


Why should the public give you their vote?


Professionally I am an accountant and in the past I have worked at a senior level in the District’s finance department for many years.  I have worked in government, understand it’s protocols and systems.  I was appointed to the OCP Implementation Monitoring Committee last year and have studied the OCP inside and out as my bedtime reading.  It is an excellent document and I have been dismayed at the amount of re-zonings and amendments that the current council has done.  It is a living document and is suppose to be reviewed every 5 years and we are now 2 years overdue.  I want the community to have input a 2019 review.


What issues do you want to focus on?


I have a number of issues I want to focus on but the top three are: transportation & infrastructure, housing affordability and development, council transparency & accountability.

Transportation and infrastructure has not kept up with the pace of development so we need to slow down development until our infrastructure catches up (ie: roads, sewers, lighting, wastewater, sidewalks, schools, hospital etc.).  We need a more efficient transit system to just get around the North Shore never mind trying to get over the bridges.

Housing “affordability” needs to be addressed to accommodate all community residents including the young, the new families, established families, seniors and the disabled.  The District needs to have a diverse range of housing and work with non-profit organizations like Habitat Humanity to provide subsidized housing.  The DNV should also lobby both provincially and federally to get them back into offering incentives such as tax credits to developers to build more “affordable” housing.  I would like to see the definition of “affordable” be tied to income not market.  The last several years we have been building $1.2M+ market condos that are not affordable to most, causing renovictions and people leaving the North Shore as they cannot afford to live here.  Workers are also leaving so businesses are now having trouble getting or retaining workers.  This lack of housing affordability will result in current businesses closing and new businesses will choose to start-up somewhere else.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


I have lived in Lynn Valley for over 38 years and have raised my two adult children here as a single mom during their adolescence so I know Lynn Valley well.  My priorities would be:

       -getting more public transit more often to make connections during more hours of the day

       -lobby for a B-Line bus from Lynn Valley to the Quay

       -slow down development and concentrate any density in the town center

       -phase developments so as not to have a negative impact on the surrounding neighbourhood

       -keep older rental stock to the end of it’s useful life to avoid renovicting people into a .5% rental vacancy market ie:  Emery Village

       -build rental stock

       -build more diverse housing for all stages of one’s life

       -provide a youth center

       -promote Lynn Valley Village (mall) as a good place to do business

       -keep all our green spaces and parks protected

Little rippers ready to ride

Little rippers will be taking to the trails this weekend for the the second youth riding event of the season put on by the North Shore Mountain Bike Association.   


Trails for all


This season the NSMBA has been actively trying to expand follow its motto: Trails for all, trails forever. From reworking parts of the Bobsled to make it accessible to adaptive mountain bikes to its larger plans for a Seymour Mountain adaptive mountain bike loop – soon people who cannot participate in traditional two-wheel mountain biking will be able to shred the mountain on three- or four-wheeled bikes. In the same vein, the NSMBA kicked off a youth riding series in 2018. Its next event is Sunday, Sept. 23,  on Mt. Fromme.


Toonie time


“The more youth mountain bikers we have, the more kids mountain biking, the more kids running, the more kids walking, the more kids we have understanding and advocating for healthy use of our forests,” said Ryan Pugh, administrator for NSMBA. “As more kids get into outdoor recreation – no matter what they are doing – hiking, biking, camping it’s another way for them to get introduced to stewardship and taking care of our natural areas – especially our local areas.”

The Youth Toonie Series builds on the successful Fiver series which saw adult riders gathering twice a month for some leisurely racing and community connection – often with a charity component like the $6000 raised last week for the Autism BC and the Canucks Autism Network. While the Fivers will kick off again next April, youth are invited to trails this week.

“We were seeing more youth turning up to the Fivers,” said Pugh. “We wanted to create something that would be just for them.”

While not a race, the Toonie rides are about getting kids aged 2-13+ out on the trails and celebrating the riding community. Run bikes can take on Roadside Attraction, while pedalers challenge that trail too, the Griffens or Boblsed.

“If they want a challenge they can tackle all three,” said Pugh. “Parents can do whatever they need to do to help them down the trails. Some ride, some run, and some kids do it on their own.”

The first event earlier this year had over 100 kids take to the trails. The NSMBA knew families wanted this. The organization heard from parents whose children had done other events in places like Squamish.

“If parents love riding, kids love riding,” said Pugh.

Grab a toonie, your helmet and bike and meet up at Mount Fromme Sept. 23 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Ride registration is from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Bring gloves, armour and a backpack if you have it – but it’s not necessary. There will be treats and games for participants. Full details on Facebook or here, and participants are asked to register so the NSMBA can plan for all participants. While the Endless Biking is helping out with the event, the NSMBA would love some volunteers.


MTB symposium


If you love mountain biking and what to get even more involved the NSMBA is hosting the Western Mountain Bike Advocacy Symposium Oct. 12-14 focusing on Building a Diverse Mountain Bike Community. It will also build on the NSMBA’s motto and guiding principle of Trails for all, trails forever.

“It’s a timely conversation on the need for us all to work collectively towards ensuring mountain biking is seen as an open and inclusive recreational pursuit,” said Christine Reid, executive director. “We want to introduce new perspectives, outline why this is an important issue and help create a cohesive vision for building a diverse mountain bike community.”

Presentations and discussions will include: Privilege and the Mountain Bike Community, Building First Nations Relationships, Adaptive Mountain Biking, Supporting Youth Voices, and Reducing Barriers to Participation. More information can be found here.

 

Photos courtesy of NSMBA. 


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Neighbourhood News – September 2018

There are still a few weeks left for some fun summer activities and adventures before it’s back to school time. July was a warm one and August started off slightly cooler and although we’re in the midst of another heat wave, some rain and reprieve should be coming this weekend. Stage 1 water restrictions are still in effect and can change quickly in August when there’s a lack of rain. Check the North Vancouver District site regularly for updates.

With summer fruit ripening in many Lynn Valley yards, be sure to keep bear awareness on your mind. Find out more in our article below. And it is sadly (or maybe happily) time to start thinking about back to school and Fall planning, we’ve got the scoop on some upcoming registration dates.

PS. Don’t forget to keep your eye on our Eye ❤️ Lynn Valley contest on Facebook for some great prizes.

Culture Days: Shaketown

Lynn Valley will be buzzing with activity for the ninth annual Culture Days September 28-30th. Events and activities will be happening throughout Canada, North Vancouver and in our very own neighbourhood.


North Shore Culture


Culture Days is an opportunity for people of all ages and abilities to try something new, experience something totally different, discover creative spaces in the community and meet the artists that work there. North Vancouver Parks and Recreation have centred the events at seven different “Hubs” throughout the District and City of North Vancouver.

“North Shore Culture Days celebrates the vital role that arts and culture plays in creating vibrant and connected communities. We invite residents to participate, be inspired and have some fun.” said Heather Turner, director, North Vancouver Recreation & Culture Commission.

We have two picks for Lynn Valley:

  1. Saturday Sept. 29; 10-11 a.m. Shaketown Walk with NVMA curator Karen Dearlove , Community History Centre, 3203 Institute Road, Lynn Valley
  2. Saturday, Sept. 29; 2-3 p.m. The Glorious Mountains of Vancouver’s North Shore with author David Crerar,  Community History Centre, 3203 Institute Road, Lynn Valley

Shaketown


At the turn of the last century, Lynn Valley isolated, forested and at the edge of the frontier.

“It really was in the mountains,” said North Vancouver Museum and Archives Curator Karen Dearlove. “Before bridges it was a fairly remote. Just to get up here traveling from Burrard Inlet was difficult. It was mostly skid roads for the mills.”

Ca. 1909. Hastings Creek bridge and boardwalk on Lynn Valley Road, with flume running overhead.

The heavily treed landscape was bisected by Tote Road, a rugged skid road that allowed oxen to haul felled logs down to the Moodyville waterfront, “Centre Road” (now Mountain Highway), and Pipeline Road, a plank road along which a pipeline was installed to carry drinking water from Rice Lake into North Vancouver.

Its relative remoteness and difficulty did not keep people away. The community was first called Shaketown because of the mill – on Mill Street – producing cedar shakes or perhaps it was because of the the shake-sided shacks housing the necessary workers.

“Because the workers at the mills wanted to live close by, homes were built, stores opened, clubs and churches were formed. There was an influx into the area and quite quickly it became a community,” said Dearlove.

The appeal of good jobs, land and a community drew a diverse group of workers from early Chinese and Japanese workers, to industrialists from Vancouver and a number of families from Finland, plus many others, she said.

“Many were like Walter Draycott – they had a sense of adventure,” she said.


Shaketown Walk


Ca. 1910. Depicting the new streetcar line at Lynn Valley Road and Ross Road. The Lynn Valley general store is at the right.

The September 29th Shaketown walk will take participants on an hour-long stroll through Lynn Valley, centring on the intersection of Lynn Valley Road and Mountain. Dearlove will present historical images alongside today’s environment to explore juxtaposition of then and now.

“We have some really great historical photos that show how buildings have changed or moved,” she said.   

The guided walk should be easy for most abilities. It begins at the Community History Centre, 3203 Institute Road, Saturday,  Sept. 29, 10-11 a.m. Participants must pre-register by calling 604 990 3700 x8016.

For all the Cutlure Days events check out the  NVRC website at https://www.nvrc.ca/arts-culture/culture-days (for Lynn Valley events, click on the Lynn Valley Hub accordion on the webpage) or the national website at https://culturedays.ca/en.

All images courtesy of the North Vancouver Museum and Archives.

To learn more about Lynn Valley’s history check out this page.


Historic images


ca. 1950s. Panoramic image along Lynn Valley Road, across from Mountain Hwy. Buildings depicted from left to right: the Brier Block; the Triangle block; the Fromme block. Lynn Valley United Church can be seen behind the Fromme block. This image was taken after the streetcar lines had been removed.

Culture Days: Glorious Mountains

From zeppelin logging to secret whiskey caches, the tales and trails of North Shore mountains come alive in a new book from locals David and Harry Crerar and Bill Maurer. Highlights from The Glorious Mountains of  Vancouver’s North Shore will be shared at the upcoming Culture Days Festival in Lynn Valley.


Ninth annual Culture Days September 28-30th


Culture Days is an opportunity for people of all ages and abilities to try something new, experience something totally different, discover creative spaces in the community and meet the artists that work there. North Vancouver Parks and Recreation have centred the events at seven different “Hubs” throughout the District and City of North Vancouver.

“North Shore Culture Days celebrates the vital role that arts and culture plays in creating vibrant and connected communities. We invite residents to participate, be inspired and have some fun.” said Heather Turner, Director, North Vancouver Recreation & Culture Commission.

We have two picks for Lynn Valley:

  1. Saturday Sept. 29; 10-11 a.m. Shaketown Walk with NVMA curator Karen Dearlove , Community History Centre, 3203 Institute Road, Lynn Valley
  2. Saturday, Sept. 29; 2-3 p.m. The Glorious Mountains of Vancouver’s North Shore with author David Crerar,  Community History Centre, 3203 Institute Road, Lynn Valley

Glorious Mountains


For David Crerar the love of the mountains came early. It was puttering around the neighbourhood heading off on random trails – sometimes ending up in Deep Cove at about eight-years-old after following the Baden Powell trail after school, well that was only once, he says.

Author David Crerar with giant cedar on slopes of Zinc Mountain

“My parents appreciated the outdoors and were content to let me play around in the forest and explore,” said Crerar, still a North Shore resident and now a lawyer. “We lament we couldn’t quite give our kids the same experience – more because of cars than bears, so my way was to embrace outdoor adventures. Walking, hiking, exploring – I think they did Little Goat Mountain behind Grouse by the time they were three.”

His passion for local hills lead to the creation of a contest to encourage local trail runners to hit as many peaks as they can in a single season.

“I found there wasn’t a list,” said Crerar. So he began making one, which lead to more research and now, eight years of research later, a book is complete.


From Dreams to Pages


With friend Bill Maurer, and high-school-aged son Harry, Crerar has written The Glorious Mountains of Vancouver’s North Shore – a Peakbaggers Guide that goes well beyond the typical trail guide.  

“In the marvelous 105 Hikes by Stephen Hui, it covers, I think, only 10 of the hikes,” he said. “And although it is classified as a hiking book, I almost prefer to think of it as everything you need to or wanted know about these mountains in our backyard. Even folks who aren’t hikers will find history and culture.

“There has never been a book written like this which focuses on the North Shore peaks and which tries to provide not only a comprehensive list of hiking routes but the history of the mountains not only hiking use but the long industrial history beyond the obvious forestry – did you know there is an existing zinc claim in the [Lynn] Headwaters Regional Park on the Hanes Valley trail?”

The authors also recognize the history in the mountains extends well past the European contact.

“I think we have written the most comprehensive collection of local indigenous people use of and names for not only mountains, but also creeks and islands and everything,” said Crerar. “We’ve researched the archaeological finds and there is a fair bit of information on Squamish and TsleilWaututh nations.”

There a nuggets and secrets like this peppered throughout a short conversation with Crerar. The depth of his local knowledge perhaps only trumped by his enthusiasm to get outside. Take Lynn Peak for instance, right in our own backyard.

“Did you know the park sign leading to the peak – isn’t technically the peak? It’s a viewpoint,” he said. “Most people don’t know the reason it is clear and makes a nice view point is that in the 1960s there was a zeppelin logging operation there and that was the mountaintop docking station. They would basically float this big balloon up and put a bunch of logs on it and float it down again. If you bike along the Lower Seymour Conservation trail lower down and to the east, you will find Balloon Creek and the Balloon Picnic Area – they are there for a reason. It tells a relatively unknown and wacky bit of North Shore history.”


Culture Days


First ascent of the Camel August 4, 1908

Much of the research the authors undertook was at Lynn Valley’s North Vancouver Museum and Archives and the Community History Centre, which also houses the BC Mountaineering Club archive. David Crerar will be returning Sept. 29th from 2-3 p.m. to share more secrets from his book and local highlights. Pre-registration is required: call 604 990 3700 x8016.

“I’ll be talking about waterfalls you don’t know about, First Nations history, wildlife – there are still mountain goats in our local mountains,” said Crerar. “If you hike back there you will see old mining claims, old mining stakes, old metal stoves – there is so much mining history back there and Vancouverites really have no idea. There are a bunch of plane crashes in mountains. There has been a fairly recent phenomena of whiskey caches – there are so many unique things to learn about.”

David Crerar’s book The Glorious Mountains of Vancouver’s North Shore is available now and he will be speaking Sept. 29 from 2-3 p.m. at the Community History Centre 3203 Institute Road, Lynn Valley. Pre-register: 604 990 3700 x8016.

Photos courtesy of David Crerar and Rocky Mountain Books. 

For all the Cutlure Days events check out the  NVRC website at https://www.nvrc.ca/arts-culture/culture-days (for Lynn Valley events, click on the Lynn Valley Hub accordion on the webpage) or the national website at https://culturedays.ca/en.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

3 pieces of homework to do this Fall to take advantage of a changing real estate market

There have been some changes and lots of chatter about the local housing market in the last few months. LynnValleyLife’s experts believe strongly that for some it may be the perfect time to make a long awaited move. While some segments of the housing market are going strong, others are measurably dropping and every indication is they will continue to do so. Combine this with the new tougher lending rules which have taken many buyers out of the market and the result is a unique opportunity to “move up” for those who have or can gain access to some funds.  There is no time like now to do your homework and see if you fit into this group.


Step 1 Explore your capacity (“Could I do it, if I wanted to?”)


“We know from our experience current statistics and trends – this is absolutely time for a certain part of the market to make a move up,” says Jim Lanctot, realtor and LynnValleyLife’s founder. “But we also know it is not worth the stress and heartburn if the new lending rules make it impossible, even though your cash flow says you can do it.”

Take a look at the last few years and assess your life changes – promotions, additional income, less debt – and how they have impacted your borrowing capacity, says Lanctot.

“The rules brought in on January 1st have changed the lending landscape and your life may have changed too,” said Lanctot. “Go in and have a chat with a mortgage broker to fully understand the new rules and get a clear picture of purchasing capacity. It’s invaluable information and the mortgage brokers do it for free.”

September is a great time to reach out to your broker or touch base with one of several experienced LynnValleyLife’s mortgage brokers such as:  Mortgage Dave,  Tim Hill or Linda Findlay.


Step 2.  Take advantage of market changes (“Do I want to do it?”)


“For those that can afford to move up from the $1.25M – $1.6M bracket to the $1.75M+ bracket this is a time to put some cash in the bank,” says Lanctot. “It looks like the next 90 days offer a unique opportunity sell while buying in the next six months could have you measurably ahead.”

The fluctuations and changes in the real estate market haven’t been affecting the different price segments equally.

“The market is healthy – to very healthy – below the $1.7M mark,” explains Lanctot. “If you have been looking to move up from below $1.7M to above $1.7M it’s the time for you.”

The typical balanced ebb and flow of a buyer’s vs. seller’s market isn’t happening in Lynn Valley right now. Above the $1.7M mark the market shifts dramatically towards a buyers market, he said.

“If sale prices are dropping at certain percentage –  for example a $2.5M home last year looks like it will be selling for less and you are selling your home for $1.6M it means you now have a smaller step up to buy,” adds Kelly Gardiner, LynnValleyLife founder and realtor.


Step 3.  Talk to Your Local Experts (“Make a plan and do it”)


“A lot has happened in 2018 – government policy has changed, mortgage rules tightened and the market has shifted,” says Lanctot. “There is no crystal ball or guarantees, but all signs are pointing to a unique opportunity for some families – and you don’t have to fly solo.”

September is a great time to harness the momentum of summer’s end  and reassess the future.

“Come in and have a cup of coffee,” says Lanctot. “There are good opportunities locally. Together, we can help you understand where you are in the market with what you currently own and create that plan to get you in the home or investment that fits your current needs and financing capabilities.”  

The LynnValleyLife office is located at 3171 Mountain Highway. Jim Lanctot and Kelly Gardiner can be reached at 778-724-0112 or at JL@lynnvallelife.com or Kelly@LynnValleyLife.com.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Get active getting to school

The streets and local schools will soon be buzzing with small, medium and large feet.

This is a great time to think about how your children are getting to school. Studies show that students who are able to have some physical activity before class are more mentally prepared to learn, have better physical fitness and moods, and improved safety from less cars on the road.

The North Vancouver School District is encouraging students and parents to leave the car behind.


Argyle Secondary


Students come from all over North Vancouver to attend Argyle Secondary – whether for the French Immersion program, special sports academies or its unique education programs. While much of the school population does live within walking distance, there are plenty of commuters that need to make their way school.  

With construction vehicles and congestion from the school’s new build, consider SD44’s Transit/Carpool/Drive-to-Five campaign: ​If students cannot walk, cycle or roll to school, then public transit, carpooling and ‘drive-to-five’ are the next best options. These options reduce congestion around schools, which is much safer for students (and much less stressful for parents). Public transit and carpooling are also better options for environmental preservation than driving individual cars to and from school. Drive-to-five gives students an additional five minutes of physical activity twice a day, which has both physical and mental health benefits for students. Both carpooling and drive-to-five also create community connections with other families.

With Lynn Valley Centre a five minute walk away – it’s the perfect place to take a bus.


Elementary Schools


There are plenty of active ways to get to school and school district has partnered with the District of North Vancouver to publicize the safest active transportation routes to neighbourhood schools. The Transit/Carpool/Drive-to-Five campaign also can work for older elementary students and all-round will make the streets safer for all students by reducing traffic around the congested school areas.

SD44, the North Vancouver RCMP, ICBC, the City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver, offer these tips for planning and practicing your active routes to school:

  • PLAN & PRACTICE! Plan your walk or cycle route in advance, and then practice it and adjust as needed. HUB has also created a cycling routes map of North Vancouver.
  • LOOK! Always look left-right-left and shoulder check before crossing.
  • LOOK! Pay attention to where you are going and do not use your phone or device while walking/rolling.
  • LISTEN! Remove your headphones so you can hear approaching traffic.
  • BE SEEN! Wear reflective materials or bright clothes and use lights after dark.

VISIT! Visit the Active and Safe Routes to School website section on the North Vancouver School District website for more walking and rolling tips.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Neighbourhood News – August 2018

There are still a few weeks left for some fun summer activities and adventures before it’s back to school time. July was a warm one and August started off slightly cooler and although we’re in the midst of another heat wave, some rain and reprieve should be coming this weekend. Stage 1 water restrictions are still in effect and can change quickly in August when there’s a lack of rain. Check the North Vancouver District site regularly for updates.

With summer fruit ripening in many Lynn Valley yards, be sure to keep bear awareness on your mind. Find out more in our article below. And it is sadly (or maybe happily) time to start thinking about back to school and Fall planning, we’ve got the scoop on some upcoming registration dates.

PS. Don’t forget to keep your eye on our Eye ❤️ Lynn Valley contest on Facebook for some great prizes.