Party on: Concerts coming back to LVV

It looks like programming and events might be returning to Lynn Valley Village this summer! There are dates scheduled for both music and family games on the calendar.


The sound of music


A little piece of the Vancouver International Jazz Fest is hitting Lynn Valley Village plaza on June 26. Toronto’s Kobo Town will deliver its redefinition of Calypso music and Caribbean sound. It will be a chance to get the whole family moving during the free concert from 2-4 pm.

Kobo Town will be a perfect band for a sunny afternoon in Lynn Valley Village,” said Fiona Black, producer, North Shore Jazz Series in partnership with TD Vancouver International Jazz Festival.  “Typically for the Lynn Valley show, we strive to get an upbeat, family-friendly, fun band that will get folks dancing and enjoying the summer vibe in that great location. Drew Gonsalves, the leader of the band, hails from Trinidad and brings a very authentic calypso Caribbean sound mixed with ska and reggae for an irresistible, danceable blend of intoxicating beats.”

Starting June 25, there are eight events in eight days bringing both Canadian and international jazz to the North Shore Jazz Series. The events are produced independently through The BlueShore at CapU in partnership with the TD Jazz Festival. It was born out of a series of highlighting students’ achievements that was extended to partner with Coastal Jazz to create the NS Jazz Series. The BlueShore Financial Centre for the Performing Arts will be offering four ticketed events this year with additional four free community concerts. 

“I was conscious of developing a series that was distinctive from the offerings of the main festival and not attempt to compete with their shows,” said Black.  “It made NSJ delve into many genres beyond jazz to make it a unique offering that would be complementary to the main festival.”  

The events are an opportunity to hear something new.

“Jazz in the context of jazz festivals certainly is more of an umbrella term inclusive of many styles and genres,” she said.  “In addition to our purely jazz offerings, NSJ offers blues and world music which are certainly related to jazz and often employ some improvisation and stylistic similarities.  The TD jazz festival is a great opportunity to be open to new sounds, new bands and new experiences with lots of free and accessible options.”


Other summer plaza events


Doing a little digging, it appears North Vancouver Rec is adding additional programming on Tuesdays and Thursdays evenings in the plaza with Family Big Games starting June 28 but the organization would not confirm any specific information at this time. Check out their page sometime in the future.  


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Party on: Lynn Valley Days

One of Lynn Valley’s most missed traditions is returning for the first time since 2019: Lynn Valley Days. Block off your calendar for July 15 & 16 for the gala, parade and festival.


108 years old


It has been a quiet couple of years. As the world slowly opens again the Lynn Valley Lions are ready to bring the beloved Lynn Valley Days community festival back. 

“We are excited,” said Tania Newman, LV Lions secretary and co-producer of Lynn Valley Days. “We are seeing a lot of interest in the parade and exhibitors – it seems like people are keen to come back.”

Throughout its more than century of history, LV Days has taken place in just about every month from May to September, and this year the club has moved the event to July. 

“This is 100 percent a weather decision,” said Newman. “July might present some challenges with people on summer vacation but the weather hasn’t been the best in May or June. I can remember my first year – it was miserable, torrential rain.”


Community comfort


With the planning process given the green light, LV Days will be much the same as previous years with special care given to covid-safety. 

“We are an open-air event, and we hope people take as much space as they need to enjoy the event. We have changed the layout a bit and are thinking about how to best manage lines,” she said. “Our discussions with the District of North Vancouver have us asking that parade participants don’t hand anything out.”

Besides the goal of limiting contacts, the move is also to reduce the environmental footprint of the event. 

The event of the season

The classic festival that residents have come to love with rides and attractions, fair food, the community stage and exhibitors is ready to hit the field again. 

“We have some new ideas for food service,” said Newman. “And for the first time, we will have Lynn Valley wood carver [Ben Hemara] creating a piece on site.”

Also returning is the Friday night Gala. 

“We have a great party band – Side One – that will get the tent jumping. We are bringing in some of the carnival fun that is part of the main festival. Never before have we had the candy floss at the gala and this year we will have an adult snow cone.”

The night will focus on friends, food and fun with so many people ready to enjoy Lynn Valley. 

“People are looking to celebrate.”


50 years of Lynn Valley community work


The Lions are also using Lynn Valley Days to celebrate their more than 50 years of community work. 

“What I am most proud of is the Lions’ ability to react,” said Newman. “Just days before 2018 Lynn Valley Days we had the tragic Mountain Village Garden Apartment fire where two people died. We saw the community come together and we were able to act as a collection place for donations. Ever since then, the [Lynn Valley] Lions have had a community emergency fund and the Lynn Valley community donates throughout the year.

“We are able to get people what they need. We are independent and mobilize quickly. We don’t have to deal with the red tape of the government or some related organizations. We have grass-root connections and we are transparent.”

Most recently they lept into action partnering with Fraser Valley charities to support flood victims and dedicating a portion of the Christmas tree funds to directly benefit more than 16 families who were flooded out of their homes.

Unlike many volunteer organizations that collapsed during the pandemic, the LV Lions grew. And unlike many other chapters, many of the new members are young – diversifying the skills of the group, said Newman. 

“We do have a lot of fun but we are a humanitarian organization,” said Newman. “The international Lions’ slogan fits: ‘Where there is a need, there is a lion.’”

While the group grows, with such a long pause on Lynn Valley Days, it will be many members’ first time participating on the organizing side. 

“The people here are amazing, this is going to be a good festival – it’s going to be a lot of fun.”

To register as an exhibitor or parade participant or to purchase gala tickets visit lvlions.com. Get ready to enjoy Lynn Valley Days on July 15 and 16th, 2022. 


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Spring maintenance and heat dome preparation

What a spring – we had snow on the local mountains this past week and temperatures overnight are still hovering around 4° C. It’s hard to believe that it was about five weeks from now, last year, we saw backyard temperatures of 43° C. We have put together some tips to get ready for summer – if winter ever leaves us behind.


Heat dome


We live in a special place, on the edge of the forest at the edge of a city. We know that this intersection makes Lynn Valley special and the people who live here care deeply about our wild areas. However, there is tension between urban and wild areas and we have to take care of both – last year we spoke to the DNV Fire Rescue services about preparing our homes for wildfires

DNV Fire Rescue cooling kids off at Lynn Valley Park.

It may be unlikely we have another heat dome like last year’s extreme heat but the statistics have temperatures climbing and longer stretches of warm weather are becoming more common. A heat warning, as defined by Environment Canada, means daytime and nighttime temperatures or humidex values are expected to be higher than the average high temperature for 2 or more days in a row.

Here is what you can do to prepare:

Before:

  • Listen to local news and weather reports for heat warnings.
    • Know the humidex rating – it combines the temperature and humidity to indicate how hot the weather feels to the average person.
  • Find ways to keep cool before hot weather starts.
    • Arrange air conditioning and fans to help keep your home cool.
    • Find out where you can go to get cool such as public libraries, malls, and municipal cooling centers: last year the NVDPL opened for cooling, as did the Pipeshop on Lonsdale and there were additional misting centres. 
    • Discuss heat safety with members of your household. Have a plan for wherever you spend time – home, work and school – and prepare for possible power outages.
  • Get trained in first aid to learn how to treat heat-related emergencies.
  • Ensure you have sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher), as sunburned skin reduces the body’s ability to cool itself.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of cool liquids before you feel thirsty to reduce your risk of dehydration and heat-related illness.
  • Ensure that your animals’ needs for water and shade are met.
  • Make sure you know those who are most at risk in your neighbourhood, such as the elderly, children and those who are sick or in need of extra assistance.

During:

  • Stay hydrated and cool
    • Drink plenty of cool fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty, and check-in with children and seniors to make sure they are drinking regularly.
      • Avoid caffeine and alcohol because they can cause dehydration, which stops your body from controlling its temperature properly
    • Avoid being outside during the hottest part of the day (typically between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.).
    • Dress for the heat and for your activity level:
      • Wear light, loose clothing to let air circulate and heat escape.
      • Always wear a hat and apply sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher before going outside.
    • Slow down your activities as it gets hotter. Move indoors and don’t work, exercise, or play outside for an extended period of time.
      • Take frequent breaks in a cool or shady area and use a buddy system if you need to be outside when it’s hot.
    • Check on your pets and animals frequently – make sure their needs for water and shade are met.
  • Check with your neighbours, friends and those at risk.
    • Pay close attention to how you and those around you feel. Following public health guidelines in your province or territory, check on vulnerable family members, friends and neighbours (such as children, the elderly and ill) who may require assistance.
    • Heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke, can happen to anyone who stays in the heat and sun for too long.
      • Watch for symptoms of heat illness, such as:
        • Dizziness or fainting

          Lynn Valley asphalt temperature last June.

        • Nausea or vomiting
        • Headache
        • Rapid breathing and heartbeat
        • Extreme thirst
        • Decreased urination with unusually dark yellow urine
        • Changes of behaviour in children

Annual Spring home maintenance


We would all love a low-maintenance home – and the reality for that to be the case, being diligent about the little to-dos helps avoid major repair costs. Now is the time to tackle a few projects outside to maintain the appearance and value of your home. 

  •  Check out the roof

It is vital to ensure your roof is free of damage. An issue with your roof, such as damage to shingles, flashing, or leaks, can quickly impact other areas. Look for missing, torn, or curling shingles and any shingles with missing granules.

  • Clean out the gutters and downspouts

Over time, gutters and downspouts can get clogged, especially if you have many trees and vegetation in your neighbourhood. We all know that clogged gutters can cause water damage and prevent water from being directed away.

Remove any debris, patch holes in your gutter with exterior grade caulking, and check your downspouts to ensure they are properly directing it away from your structure.

  •  Inspect the foundation from the outside

Your foundation is often the source of water issues in your basement. Do a walk around the exterior, check for cracks in the foundation, and inspect the exterior walls, siding, and brick for damage. If you identify issues, contact a foundation specialist to look.

  • Check seals around exterior windows and doors

The cold weather can cause cracks or harden the caulk around your windows and doors. Inspect the seals on all windows and doors and replace them as required. This will help prevent water from getting in and help reduce your energy bill. Replace any broken or damaged screens.

  • Take a closer look at the garage doors

Check the garage doors to make sure they are working. Vacuum dust and dirt around the doors, make sure nothing could fall and prevent the doors from working properly.

  • Check the chimney

If you have a fireplace or wood-burning stove, it’s important to check the chimney and the unit for any blocks or damages. Look between the joints of bricks and stones.  Have any fallen out? Is there vegetation growing out of them? Each signals water infiltration. Also, look for efflorescence—a white calcium-like deposit that indicates your masonry joints are no longer repelling water but absorbing it.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Community events return: helicopters, North Shore Rescue & food trucks this weekend

Saturday, May 7, marks the return of community events to Lynn Valley as the Outdoor Safety and Emergency Preparedness Open House comes to Argyle Secondary School and Lynn Valley Park from 11 am-2 pm. From helicopters to search and rescue dogs, from food trucks to instructional workshops, the family event aims to bring the community together and make it a little safer.


Education and engagement


“We are so excited to welcome the community again,” said Lisa Dalla Vecchia, communications manager for SD44. “We provide education to K to 12 students but we have a strong connection to the community. We always think of what we can do, and this builds on our partnership with North Shore Rescue.”

Last year SD44 and North Shore Rescue worked together to bring local families a “Survive your own adventure” interactive video. Building on that success, coupled with the lack of engagement opportunities during the pandemic, the idea of a community event was born. The small team, Dalla Vecchia, Adam Baumann, director of instruction, and Maddy Phillips, communications assistant, have been working for months with the previous Superintendent Mark Pearmain, Acting Superintendent Syliva Russell, Argyle staff, the DNV, and numerous organizations to kick-off endemic community events again.

“We are craving connection,” said Dalla Vecchia. “Some of the events of the past few years – wildfires, floods – have raised interest in emergency preparedness. Lynn Valley is a tight community. Since its launch, we have viewed Argyle Secondary as a community asset and we are excited to welcome the public.“


Helicopters, boats and booths


One of the biggest draws for families – besides education booths – will be access to a variety of rescue vehicles – land, sea and air – available for up-close interaction. 

Photo: NSR

“Just before the event begins at 11 am, North Shore Rescue’s helicopter will be landing at Lynn Valley Park,” said Dalla Vecchia. As the helicopter arrives and departs there will be very temporary traffic and pedestrian control. 

There will be much more to see at Argyle. North Shore Rescue is planning to bring most of its fleet, along with a boat from the Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue, a ladder truck for CNV Fire Department, and the wildfire resources from the DNV Fire Rescue Service, said Dalla Vecchia. 

With limited parking at Argyle’s upper lot, Lynn Valley Elementary and St. Clement’s Anglican Church. Visitors are encouraged to take advantage of the free bike valet at Argyle or walk to the event. 

Fourteen community organizations will be onsite with education booths covering everything from earthquakes to community biking. There will be opportunities to ask questions, participate in interactive exhibits and perhaps take home some knowledge or a prize or two.

Six organizations are also offering educational workshops for pre-registered participants.

“The workshops will take place inside Argyle,” said Dalla Vecchia. “It is a fully accessible school. There are still some workshop spaces available and we have been able to add a few more spaces for North Shore Rescue presentations that had been ‘sold out.’”

The DNV Fire and Rescue Services presentations on protecting, preventing, and preparing for wildfires, and the North Shore Black Bear Society’s cohabitating with bears presentations will be especially relevant to residents of Lynn Valley. 

“NSEM is truly excited to join the North Vancouver School District for this amazing family event and to celebrate Emergency Preparedness Week,” said Emily Dicken, director, North Shore Emergency Management. There’s never been a better time to ‘get prepared’! Our staff and volunteers will be there, eager to answer all questions, and help attendees give our prize wheel a spin.”


Fun and food


Conscious of creating a family experience the Girl Guides will be offering crafts for kids – and selling their cookies! There will also be four food trucks on-site to keep tummies full. Another family highlight will be a chance to meet the working dogs of North Shore Rescue. 

“A thank you to the community and residents for their support. We hope people come, have fun and learn something.”

Details

The Outdoor Safety and Emergency Preparedness Open House takes place Saturday, May 7 at Argyle Secondary School, 1131 Frederick Road, from 11 am-2 pm. For more information or to register for presentations visit the event webpage


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Check out some community caring

Two organizations have teamed up to make Lynn Valley a little bit stronger. The North Vancouver District Public Library and St. Clement’s Anglican Church have launched Caring Community Kits to help build community.


Building on existing resilience


The congregation at St. Clement’s has spent much of the last decade reflecting on its place within the community. Governments have picked up many social services that were once the church’s role in the community and this has led the congregation to look for gaps it can fill to support and build the community, explained Rev. Peggy Trendell-Jensen, deacon.

“We can’t take a great neighbourhood for granted,” she said. “We saw after last March’s [2021] tragedy the empathy, service and compassion present in Lynn Valley. We don’t want that to erode, we want to nurture the need for a ‘common good’.”

With a church fund already in place to support efforts in the larger Lynn Valley community, Trendell-Jensen turned to the library for partnership.

“This is one of the most impactful and exciting collections we have ever developed at NVDPL,” said Krista Scanlon, manager of collection services at NVDPL. 


Concepts to kits


The donation from St. Clement’s has led to a new fund at the library, with the goal to foster a vibrant and thriving community. 

“We thought these funds that became the Caring Communities Fund would allow the librarians to purchase materials that support in any way the building of healthy families, healthy homes, and healthy neighbourhoods,” said Trendell-Jensen. 

The backpack-sized kits are to promote learning, sharing and building understanding in the community. From books to puppets to games and more, each Caring Community Kit is filled with resources on topics that promote community building, strengthen resilience, and increase interpersonal understanding.

“The kits are designed to support individual learning and understanding for all ages, while developing a sense of shared connectedness,” said Scanlon. “The hope is that they will broaden perspectives and create deeper appreciation for one another.”

Trendell-Jensen is especially proud of the diversity of the kits – both in theme and in the variety of resources.

“A family may love books, so those are in there, but not all children engage with written and visual information, so having something like a puppet is a great way to have an impact.”

The library echoes that idea.  These Caring Community Kits exemplify how the library supports learning and information sharing in a variety of ways—and in the ways that our community needs in this day and age, said Meghan Crowe communications and events coordinator for NVDPL.

“Libraries have always been about sharing resources and equitable access, but we’re also about people, spaces, and connection. We offer books, films, digital resources—and we also offer puzzles, Dungeons and Dragons Starter Kits, Radon Detector Kits, and more.”


Building blocks


With guidance from St. Clement’s initial idea, the library staff dove into thoughtful discussions about what understanding is needed to foster the foundational values of North Vancouver.

Our staff are experts at curating relevant and meaningful collections. So in addition to the original proposal from St. Clement’s, our staff really tapped into the topics that we know our community wants to learn about and what is relevant to community members,” said Crowe. “For example, our community cares deeply about topics like anti-racism and reconciliation. We’re seeing requests for information on these topics in other collection areas, and as we all continue our own personal growth journeys, topics like this were natural choices for some of the kits.”

For Trendell-Jensen, the inclusion of a further resources card is an important piece.

“The resources guide helps families explore organizations and books on these topics beyond just the kit,” she said. “The kits are fabulous – and not just geared to families or children. There are some for adults to cultivate community building – like conversation starters. This is an evolving project. I would love to see something like a kit on how to have difficult conversations to help people negotiate topics where there is disagreement but we need to all hear each other.” 

Other topics geared toward adults are mindfulness, anti-racism and truth and reconciliation. 

Check it out

There are 15 Caring Communities Kits in circulation based out of the Lynn Valley branch. They can also be borrowed by any NVDPL patron, at any branch, said Crowe. They are also in the process of adding more kits with plans to display them at Parkgate and Capilano libraries as well.

“All you have to do is search “Caring Community Kit” in the catalogue to see all of the different kit titles. Patrons can place holds on their kit of choice for convenient pick-up at any NVDPL location.”

With the Caring Communities Fund now established Trendell-Jensen hopes residents will think of it as a place to donate. 

“It is a way to have a very direct impact on the health and wellbeing of the neighbourhood. If you are looking to help out the community or remember someone, my hope is people will think of it and make a donation.”


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Music and events returning to the plaza

There is hope that music and events will return to Lynn Valley Plaza this summer and the North Vancouver Recreation and Culture Commission has opened auditions for a return to its seasonal events. 


Looking ahead


The NVRC is in the thick of planning and preparing for a summer that looks more like 2019, that the past two pandemic years. It might not be a “back to normal” but the plans sound like it will be a big step forward. 

As we are once again able to gather, art expression, art-making, and creativity are a wonderful way to bring children, youth, adults, and seniors together,” said Jeremy Neill, marketing coordinator for the commission. “NVRC is currently accepting applications from emerging, mid-career, and professional artists.”

Performers and artists are welcome to submit their applications through April 30. 

This is an excellent opportunity for artists to conceive and showcase their work, creativity, skills, imagination and talent in a public space,” he said. “All art genres are welcome including visual and multidisciplinary arts, music, dance, and theatre.” 


How to apply


The programmers are aiming to encourage community engagement and highlight cultural richness and diversity. Successful applicants bring unique and engaging experiences that are intended for audiences in a variety of North Vancouver neighbourhoods and are delivered through outdoor workshops or performances. 

For more details on the process and application details visit the NVRC website


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Spring Break in the Wild

As things slowly return to normal there are a handful of activities to check out during Spring Break and we are pleased to expect more to be offered as we head toward summer.


Wildlife Weeks


The Lynn Canyon Ecology Centre is offering both mini-camps and its wonderful Wildlife Weeks during Spring Break. Their camps are full (protip: become a member or sign-up for their newsletter to get an advance heads up for summer) but there are still in-person and virtual experiences for March 14-25 for their Wildlife Weeks. The suggested donation is $3.50 per person or $6 per family which is used to support other community organizations that share their knowledge during the Centre’s programs. Content is geared to ages 6+

“We have eight events, with six guest presenters,” said Cassie Allard, Ecology Centre education programer. “There are five online and three in-person events. We are so happy to be back being able to do something outside – to be able to look at some things,  touch some things, and even taste some things. There is a lot happening – the birds are chirping and plants are starting to grow.”

This is a great time to be out in the canyon with spring solidly on its way. There are signs of salmonberry and huckleberry bushes plumping up, skunk cabbage (one of bears’ favourite post-hibernation foods) sprouting and ferns unfurling, she said. 

“Our outdoor walks – are a bit of hiking,” said Allard. “There are lots of stairs so it is not stroller-friendly but babies that enjoy being in a carrier are welcome.”


Virtual events


Courtesy of Fur-Bearers

With the success of its pandemic pivot to online programs, the centre is reaching people from across Canada and the globe. Regular participants from the UK and New York join to learn more about our coastal rainforest, she said.

“The best chance to see some animals will be the Swoop and Soar presentation by the OWL Rehabilitation Centre.  I think the Canada’s Superhero presentation about beavers will be a good one,” said Allard. “Presenting for the first time for us is Dana Eye, a biologist who is passionate about rattlesnakes – but I don’t think there will be any live rattlesnakes at that one.”

At the Centre

If organized events aren’t your thing, the Ecology Centre is also open for visitors. 

“We have so many things going on,” said Allard. “The gift shop is freshly stocked. We have a colouring contest for Wildlife Weeks. We have two family scavenger hunts – one indoor and one outdoor.”

If family programming isn’t your thing, the centre has its gardening series launching this Saturday (scroll part way down this page for details). From starting seeds to babying tomatoes to protecting pollinators and much more are on offer. 

Following Wildlife Weeks the Ecology Centre will also be hosting its adult One Earth Series beginning April 2 which are suitable for those 15+.

A reminder: if visiting or participating in an in-person program, Lynn Canyon Park now has pay parking and residents can apply for a permit here

 


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Where local government meets wildlife

There has been a lot of planning and future thought put into the development of Lynn Valley and the District of North Vancouver as a whole. Lynn Valley’s unique mountainside location has more than just human neighbours. We reached out to the DNV to learn more about the policy and planning that is going on to protect and promote wildlife in the community.   


Policy planning


In July 2021 the DNV council adopted an OCP Action Plan. It was a process to check-in on the current OCP adopted in 2011. 

“ The OCP Action Plan includes a priority action to strengthen the resiliency of natural environments, with the goal of protecting and enhancing ecosystem health,” said Courtenay Rannard, communications coordinator for the DNV. 

“Council recently directed staff to develop and implement a biodiversity strategy to protect, restore, and enhance ecosystem health within our community, including protecting and enhancing wildlife habitat and ecological networks.”


It will support a number of ongoing projects like the
Urban Tree Canopy Project that provides native trees and shrubs to residents – free of charge – to plant on their own properties, she said. The Urban Tree Canopy Project will return again this fall. 

“As they grow, these trees provide shelter and food for many species and animals,” said Rannard.


Streams and creeks


The North Shore is braided with streams and creeks. These unique features are foundations of local wildlife habitat and their care and protection are top of mind at the District. 

“We’re in the process of developing an Integrated Stormwater Management Plan, which will improve streamside habitat, reduce pollution in our creeks and streams, and improve groundwater conditions,” said Rannard.

 The DNV has designated streamside (riparian) protection development areas which aim to protect the natural setting, ecosystems and watershed. 

Riparian areas are home to many different species of wildlife and serve as important wildlife corridors throughout the district,” said Rannard. “Wildlife corridors are crucial to promote the safe movement of birds and animals, as well as respite areas in urban settings. If a resident owns a home that falls within this DPA and wants to seek a building permit, they must first go through a review with the Environment Department before a permit is issued.”

There are similarly designated areas protecting other natural areas, and like streamside protection areas, require homeowners must first go through a review with the Environment Department before a permit is issued.


Bylaws and policies supporting wildlife


Some animal protections have been put in place like the 2020 ban on anticoagulant rodenticides

“By banning rodenticides where we can, we are actively supporting owls and other birds of prey by removing rodenticide from the food web,” said Rannard. “While owls are the most studied species when it comes to rodenticide, research has shown that many other species are negatively impacted by rodenticide including songbirds, raccoons, and coyotes, as well as domestic animals like cats and dogs.”

Another key management area is to reduce the amount of invasive species in the area. 

 “Our Invasive Species Strategy guides our work to prevent and control harmful, invasive plants such as knotweed, hogweed, and English Ivy,” said Rannard. “More than two dozen species of invasive plants have established in the District. Other examples of invasive species include the European fire ant, goldfish, and many others.”

In recent years residents may have noticed a change in our forests parks. There is more material left behind after maintenance, which is all a part of a larger restoration plan. 

“We leave large woody debris in our parks when we plant restoration areas,” she said. “We identify areas where large woody debris can be left as small mammal habitat. We know that small mammals need logs to run on and, more importantly, under. Where possible, we also leave wildlife snags (standing dead trees) in these areas to provide habitat for cavity-nesting birds and other species.”


Small acts, big impacts


As we live alongside wildlife there are practices homeowners can undertake to better co-exist. 

“We all have a unique set of responsibilities when it comes to living so close to the wilderness,” said Rannard. “Properly managing household waste is one of the most impactful ways that residents can help.”

Canadian Tiger Swallowtail

Just this week, Lynn Valley’s first bear was sighted awake from hibernation. 

 “Each year as bears come out of hibernation and wildlife becomes more active, we work closely with the North Shore Black Bear Society to educate our community on ways to reduce encounters between humans and local wildlife,” she said. “Keeping properties clear of attractants, only setting garbage and organics carts out in the morning (never overnight), and being generally respectful of animal habitat areas are all ways our community can co-exist with wildlife.”

While we take care of the biggest neigbours there are also opportunities to support our tiniest neighbours and the good news it means less work for homeowners. 

 “Simple things can make a big difference,” Said Rannard.  “For example, by not keeping your garden too tidy in the spring, residents can support native bees overwintering in the vegetation. Planting pollinator-friendly plants can also have a big impact.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.