Trails from the ground up

It was a busy summer on the Shore. The local trails have been inundated with users of all kinds, even with parking lots closed walkers, hikers and bikers from all over the region made their way to our trails. It means a lot of work for hundreds of volunteers that build and maintain terrain.


Community builder


The North Shore Mountain Bike Association’s Joe Woywitka knows firsthand how busy the trails are. He spends five days a week working on taking care of the region’s trails as its trail crew lead. The covid restrictions initially changed the make of users on the trails, but as the months went on, the numbers continued to rise, he said. 

Joe Woywitka

“I am out working on the trails and the influx of new riders, trail runners and hikers has been huge,” said Woywitka. “We are seeing a lot more beginners out there – which is a good thing. I think they are seeing what goes into the trails. It’s great. It means more people for the sport, more people to support the association and get involved in advocacy for the trails.”

The NSMBA is thrilled to see more riders out – it aligns with their mandate of “Trails for all. Trails forever.” Their goal is to grow the sport to more people and with more diversity. A cause the covid pandemic has helped in its own way. 

With many riders and families spending their season out on the trails for the first time, they are seeing for the first time what it takes to keep the trails on Seymour, Cypress and Fromme safe, said Woywitka.  

“Growing up here there wasn’t the same amount of trail maintenance going on – which means fewer beginner trails or trails that made it easy to get into the sport,” he said. “What the NSMBA has been doing over the last 10 years or so is to make the trails more inclusive and help people get into the sport and also maintaining the more challenging terrain the North Shore is known for.” 


Trail work


It takes a whole community to keep the trails environmentally sustainable, safe and fun. More than 1,600 volunteers shared their time with the NSMBA last year for more than 13,000 volunteer hours. 

The NSMBA uses a dedicated group of 500 volunteers – the Shore Corps – that have all undergone training to lead its community trail days and corporate trail days. Giving a few hours to the trails is something Woywitka would like all riders to consider. With no experience necessary, the Shore Corp takes the lead on guiding volunteers. 

“They are the core group of builders we can lean on to help maintain the trails. Some have ‘their own’ trails that they are the lead builder on and are dedicated to maintain,” he said. 

Today the Corps is needed more than ever as covid protocols require smaller groups further apart. With the trail work days resumed, it is a chance to give back to the sport you love.

“Volunteers are what drives our organization and lets us get the majority of work done. You will see how not only do we maintain the trails but how we make our trails fun,” he said. “The primary focus when we are out doing any sort of trail work is sustainability. When you participate in any form of outdoor recreation there are going to be environmental impacts and our goal is to offset what comes from mountain biking and the trail maintenance. ”


Trails forever


There are a few plans in the works to add more terrain to the North Shore. For the first time, the NSMBA is working with the City of North Vancouver to establish some trails in Greenwood Park, just south of the Upper Levels. 

“We have found a suitable place to build,” said Woywitka. “The terrain is a little bit easier and it isn’t super steep like many parts of the North Shore mountains. It would be a great place for beginner and intermediate trails.”

With the expansion and redesign of trails focusing on newer riders completed over the last few years, the NSMBA is also looking to better service the experienced riders that have been using the trails for decades. 

“Over the last several years we have really rounded out the beginner and intermediate trails and we are hoping to push for a new advanced level trail,” Woywitka said. “Somewhere higher up on Fromme would be the best place for it. It is something the community has been calling for and we want to make sure we are advocating for the higher level riders.”

Visit www.nsmba.ca and check out the calendar for Community Trail Days. There is a plan for family day this fall. You can also email info@nsmba.ca for more information.

How to help support local trails

  1. Support the NSMBA with a membership purchase.
  2. Attend a trail building day.
  3. Shut down braids – the unsanctioned trails between maintained trails.

Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Growing community celebration

This has been an epic gardening season. More people than ever took to the earth and tried their hand a growing their own food. When the rest of the world was closed, the line-ups at Maple Leaf Garden Centre was well down the the block. We have fought cold and wet months, and now moths but Lynn Valley gardens have still never looked better.

And now – we celebrate! 


Virtual Fall Fair


We want to share the gardening glory and hard work being invested in yards and patios. More than anything we would love to gather and look at your summer projects – woodwork, quilts and art. While we would really love to taste your jams, jellys, pickles and pies, it doesn’t seem like the most covid-responsible idea.

Instead we are putting together a digital Fall Fair – we want to share your hard work with our readers and Facebook followers. We are running a contest from now until Sept. 30 for residents of the North Vancouver.

We have four $25 gift cards to Maple Leaf Garden up for grabs!

Send us your photos in one of these categories.

  1. Best flowers/ornamental garden
  2. Best Veggies – garden or harvest
  3. Best basket or container of any kind
  4. Best under 13 years old – I grew it myself!

Here is how you do it:

Pick ONE entry per category.

Put the category in the subject of the email.

Email the photo to robin@lynnvalleylife.com – please send a SEPARATE email for each entry. For adults there is a maximum of three entries, one per category and for children, a maximum of 4.

Include your name, postal code, phone number, age (if entering the child category) and any details you want to add about the photo.

Deadline Sept. 30, 2020.

By entering the contest you consent to receiving future editions of our newsletter, sent once a month. We will not distribute or sell your private information to others.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

A Covid kind of Halloween

Among the many changes of Covid-19 are the loss of community events. The big one for many families this fall will be the changes to Halloween. We have been thinking about how we can help the community enjoy the annual tradition in the most safe and responsible way. 


What will Halloween look like?


We are about seven weeks away from ghouls and goblins, creepers and princesses taking over the streets of Lynn Valley. The past few years celebration have centred on Wellington Drive and Dovercourt Road – where the Dovercourt Crypt has been stepping up its spookiness year after year. Last year the streets were wall to wall people with kids tightly lined up at doors that never closed.

That can’t happen this year but the celebrating can still go on in new ways. Dr.Bonnie Henry has just released this information. There is the expectation that Halloween has smaller celebrations and families will choose carefully how they celebrate. More specific guidelines will come in the weeks ahead.


Halloween neighbourhood map


We want to bring the community together – but still safely remain a part. Schools likely won’t be hosting pumpkin patches or fall fairs. We know this will leave a big hole in the heart of the community this fall.

We have some ideas and would love to hear yours – how can we embrace this holiday as a community but a part? Email us your ideas at info@lynnvalleylife.com.

We have one plan in the works and a contest or two.

We know there are a great number of Halloween displays all over the community. From Sykes to Peters and many nooks and crannies in between, we see so many get in the spooky spirit of Halloween.  LynnValleyLife will be putting together a Halloween Map. If you go over the top wth house decorations or know of a great display, please send it our way. We want families to enjoy the community spirit of Halloween – without door knocking – in the days around the holiday. You can use the from below or this link to join the map.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

The mystery trail artist of Lynn Valley

Walking the quiet trails of Lynn Valley may have been a bit noisier in recent months. When the quiet returned two new pieces of art had appeared. Some were left wondering how they appeared, others are Ross Road passersby more familiar with the work of local ‘mystery’ carver Ben Hemara.


The joy of chainsaws


A simple one-day carving class at Lee Valley Tools set Lynn’s Valley’s Ben Hemara on a path of joy – now with an accompanying soundtrack of chainsaws.

Over the past seven years he has transitioned from hand carving to using power tools. This Spring as Covid hit, Hemara was inspired to make his art more public.

“We live in Lynn Valley and I take my son and we go for walks on local trails. There are so many beautiful stumps that are old growth cedars. Cedar is so wonderful to carve,” he said. “When I did a woodspirit I thought it would be great to see one of these on the trails.”

He began his first public piece on a local trail off Allan.

“The trails through Lynn Valley are so neat how they connect and link to the different parts of the neighbourhood. I did a woodspirit and I thought it would be great to see one of these on the trails,” said Hemara. “I took it upon myself and did a piece on the trails and everyone loved it. I have gotten such positive feedback and I would like to do more. 

“Obviously I am working on dead trees.” 


Local inspiration


Two works have been completed on local trails using old-growth stumps and other dead wood. The two works can be found where Allan Road meets Draycott and on the path linking Draycott and Ross Road. The District of North Vancouver has become aware of the art and has led Hemara to take a break from carving on public land. 

“They are well aware of my artwork and I have spoken to them,” he said. “I haven’t added any since then because I don’t want to upset anyone. I am trying to bring positivity to the community and do something nice. I think it’s positive with the District. I would love to do some more pieces for the community.”


Living a dream


A New Zealand transplant and roofer by trade, Hemara balances his art with his family time. The dad, with a young son and another child on the way, spends what time he has available at carving. 

“It’s an odd artform using big power tools. The pieces are labour intensive especially since I am doing them on my own,” said Hemara. “And they sometimes require me to make my own scaffolding so I have a nice steady platform. I could probably do it in two or three full days but I am balancing my family and art.” 

The new forest works were a new project for Hemara, his usual works have much more suburban roots. 

“I usually carve at my in-laws on Ross Road – in their driveway,” he said. “I have a ton of people come by. I always display a few pieces out as I work and I have gotten a couple of commission orders from people who come by.”

His dream would be to transition out of roofing to be a fulltime carver – with his own workspace, to give the neighbours a break.

“It can be annoying for the neighbours, I try to keep it to a minimum and I know people want to enjoy their day and not hear it all weekend long,” said Hemara. 

Hemara says there is a thriving chainsaw carving community in B.C. and hopes to connect and learn more from his colleagues – and hopefully add a few more trail pieces to Lynn Valley. 

“It is so satisfying and brings joy to me to pop in and out and leave a beautiful peace of art.”

You can check more works by Ben Hemara on Facebook and he will soon be launching his own website (not currently active). 


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Masked crusader

When many young people are enjoying their last taste of summer, Lynn Valley’s Jake Musgrave is donning a mask and taking up a crusade across Canada raising money for Covid relief and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society – all by bike.


Doable


August 28th 23-year-old Musgrave will clip into his pedals and hit the road, aiming to arrive in Halifax a month later. He hopes the ride will do more than take him across the country. Musgrave hopes to raise money as well.

His dual causes – Covid-19 relief and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society – hit close to home and are more linked than it would first appear. Musgrave lost his father Randy at eight-years-old to leukemia. It’s a disease that feels powerless to fight and a surprise when it hits, he said. 

“It was so sudden,” said Musgrave. “He was healthy, active, a firefighter. He didn’t know what was happening. He inspires me to live an active, healthy life.”

Musgrave sees Covid-19 as a situation where we don’t have to go it alone. 

“Let’s be in this together, let’s protect each other,” he said. “Wear a mask so you can protect others. I don’t want someone else to have the trauma of losing a loved one.”

He is taking his own advice and is planning on riding all 6,021 kilometres while wearing a mask.   

“When I first approached I thought it would be tough. It certainly is harder to ride with the mask on – I have noticed that after some longer rides. It’s awkward but doable,” said Musgrave. “Wearing a mask and doing something small to keep everyone safe is huge support. Just think about it – wherever you go, grab your phone, your wallet, your keys, your mask.”


Across Canada


The trip has been laid out with varying distances each day from the shortest 112km to the longest 250km, with the goal to finish in 30-33 days. It could be less if he surpasses his expectations, he said. The sections were divided based on elevation gain.

“I am planning on the Coquihalla and through the Rockies at Golden and Revelstoke,” he explained. “Pretty much along the Trans Canada but I have spoken to cyclists who have done it to hear about better routes where the shoulder is wider or secret spots where I won’t get blown away by big trucks.”

While Musgrave has plenty of riding experience this will be his biggest adventure to date. 

“I have been riding from age six or seven when my dad got me out on my mountain bike – he was a very active man,” said Musgrave. “But it was really my aunt Lesley [Tomlinson] an Olympic [mountain bike]  athlete who got me into road racing in Grades 11 and 12.” 

To date Musgrave’s longest ride is 240km, just short of his expected longest ride of the trip. 

He works at the cycling gym TaG and gets in plenty of riding but is also intensifying his training working at longer distances at his goal pace around 30km/h. 

“Since I decided to do this ride I have decided to step it up,” said Musgrave. “I have always done TaG two or three times a week but I need to train harder and do it almost every single day.” 

The ride will take Musgrave the furthest east he has ever been in Canada. He credits fellow North Shore and TaG rider Jane Weller for inspiring him to aim big. 

“She rode across the country alone –  which is phenomenal. I figured if she could do it I could give it a try.” 

Musgrave, on the other hand, is choosing with his tighter timeline to be supported on the road by friends driving with a trailer. As for challenges, he is preparing for saddle sores and wind. 

“I’ve been through a lot. I think I am pretty mentally strong.” 

You can support Musgrave by donating to his two GoFundMe links: Covid-19 relief and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. You can follow his journey on Facebook and a forthcoming Instagram account. 


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Celebrating a 100 years of time and place

If you attended the fourth Lynn Valley Elementary in 1990’s through its retirement in 2004 the North Vancouver Museum and Archives is looking for your stories and those of anyone who worked or went to the school during its first century.


100 years of history


The North Vancouver Museum and Archives is putting together a new project: “A landmark transformed – 100 years of serving the community” showcasing the community history associated with it’s home at 3203 Institute Road – the former home of Lynn Valley Elementary. 

“This was the 4th Lynn Valley Elementary school which was built September 7th, 1920 and this September is its 100th anniversary,” said Archivist Jessica Bushey. “It was an incredibly important place because it was the place of education for all the children of Lynn Valley and then in 2004 it ceased being a school and underwent two years of restoration and adaptation to become the home of the archives of North Vancouver. The archives is going to celebrate that with a number of online events and community engagement programs.”

 Today sitting in the shadow of the current Lynn Valley Elementary, the facility has environmental controls, archival storage and an art vault. It will remain as the archives as the museum transitions to its new home this fall in the Shipyards. 


The projects


The staff is working to collect oral histories and archival materials from the buildings past. They have many stories from the early history from its collections as people typically pass on materials that are 50 years or older. 

LVE student and later teacher, Mollie Nye had perfect attendance.

“We already have several wonderful oral histories we have collected over the years of the leaders of the area, past students and past staff,” said Bushey. “But we noticed we have a gap in the oral histories we have of the school and the area from about 1990 to 2004. We are looking for students, teachers or principals who might have been going there or working there.”

The organization would also be interest in more records from the 1960s-80s. One goal of the information gathering is to create a HistoryPin project. 

“We hope it will show how Lynn Valley evolves and grows and transforms and what the importance of the school and education was over the course of those many decades,” she said. “We are always interested in archival materials from the community but what we are looking for are the stories connected to the photograph – if you are sending a photo make sure you know the names of all the people.”

 It is pretty simple to participate in the project. Participants can submit materials and related information or have a more extensive interview. 

“We have two really good volunteer interviews who have experience gathering oral histories,” said Bushey. “Because of Covid we are doing them remotely over the phone or on Zoom.” 


The celebration


Early fall will mark the kick off to celebrate this 100 years in Lynn Valley. 

“We would love to do an exposition at the archives but we have to limit that because of Covid,” said Bushey. “We are planning to start at the end of September to mark the start of BC Culture month. We are going to start with the online exposition, then the HistoryPin project will go live. We are also planning a Geocache adventure that will talk about the building and the history of the area and we will be celebrating home movie day in October.” 

If you would like to participate you can contact the North Vancouver Museum and Archives for more information by email at archives@dnv.org or by telephone: 604-990-3700-8012 for Daien Ide, Reference Historian or 604-990-3700-8011 for Jessica Bushey, Archivist.

 

Images courtesy of the North Vancouver Museum and Archives. 


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Working hard for their money

There are still some kids around willing to get their hands dirty to make a few dollars around Lynn Valley. Other young people are getting creative with their hustle to overcome the demise of many typical student jobs this summer. We have tracked down a few local options and if you hear of more – send them to robin@lynnvalleylife.com


Yard care by Daniel Dykema


New to the entrepreneurial scene is Upper Lynn’s Daniel Dykema. At 13-years-old Dykema is hoping to earn money for fishing gear and a small fishing boat. You may have seen his posters around advertising the new business.

“My small gardening business does mowing, weeding, trimming, watering your plants, and pretty much anything else around the yard,” he said. “I am most proud of doing everything to the max and doing it well.”

Rates start at $10 an hour. If you need a bit of work done and want to support Dykema’s fishing goals you can reach him at danjdykema@gmail.com or 604-999-0243.


Lawn Boys


At 16 and 14 Thomas and Peter Frankowski have been in business since 2014. Their Lawn Boys carbon neutral landscaping business has been taking care of Lynn Valley yards for years. Much more than lawns, they are willing to tackle just about any project. 

“We have been offering landscaping, handyman and renovation helper services since 2014,” said Thomas Framkwoski. “Mowing lawns, weeding and raking were the bulk of our jobs in the beginning. Now we are doing more complex tasks such as assisting with renovations, floor installation, demolition and painting.”

They got their start helping out around their own home. 

“Both of us learned a number of skills by working with our dad and we wanted to use these skills to be productive and offer assistance to people in our community,” he said.

They are most proud of growing their business based on recommendations from happy clients. You can check out their website or reach them at 778-917-3058.


STEMina


Local university students (and sisters) Romina and Anita Mahinpei are sharing their passion for STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and supporting important causes.

“We are both proud that we are using our business as a platform to allow the public to showcase their love for STEM while also supporting local and national causes,” said 18-year-old Romina Mahinpei. “Our first fundraiser that took place in July, we decided to donate all of STEMina’s profits to the CanadaHelps COVID-19 Healthcare & Hospital Fund and support Canadian hospitals and charities.”

The sisters have created a t-shirt line that encourages people to showcase their love of STEM. A love that keeps the sisters busy. 

“When not busy with school, we spend most of our free time volunteering for STEM organizations and hosting our own events. This past year, I worked on organizing Teen Nerd Nite, a local initiative that introduces high school students to the fields of STEM through interactive presentations.

“Meanwhile, my sister was involved with nwPlus, a club at University of British Columbia, to organize cmd-f, British Columbia’s first all-female hackathon and several smaller women in tech events. Right now, with the restrictions on in-person events, we have devoted much of our time to STEMina and aim to help the public show their passion for STEM through this platform,” she said. 

Seeing the large number of participants at our past North Vancouver events, we were aware of our community’s interest in learning more about the STEM fields. Although the pandemic has put a halt to our in-person events, we didn’t want that to stop us from following our passion for STEM. With the free time that we had while quarantined at home, we decided to dabble with T-shirt design and launch STEMina, an apparel line that would allow people to express their love for STEM with what they wear!”


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

More than books – how the NVDPL managed Covid-19

With a mandate well beyond books, the North Vancouver District Public Library, was a local leader in providing innovative programming and access to its materials and services. The move to take traditional paper and pivot to virtual services was quick and provided a much needed escape and community connection in early days of the Covid-19 pandemic. 


When everything changed


As the Covid-10 March closures unfolded throughout our community, it was perhaps the closure of the North Vancouver District Public Library that was felt most widely. From social seniors to parents and babies, from those on the society’s fringes to community-building groups – and everyone in between has always been welcome at the library until the doors were forced shut.  

 “For many of us, early March was a challenging time as we started to hear about COVID-19 impacting our community here, and particularly as we learned about the devastating outbreak at the Lynn Valley Care Centre where we make regular trips for Home Library Service Patrons,” said Jacqueline van Dyk, director of library services.  “Our hearts were with our community as we navigated the challenges presented by the pandemic in real time, as they were unfolding before us.” 

The NVDPL was asked to close its doors by the local health authority on March 16. Many people hearing the news took the last few hours to stock up on materials. 

My initial thoughts were focused on how we could keep our community and staff safe,” said van Dyk. “While everything was still very day-to-day, the one thing that became clear was that our service to the community is so vital.” 


More than just books


The library and its staff are well aware of the place it has in the community – well beyond just books. Their mandate to support all residents coloured their priorities as the organization addressed its role for the coming months. 

“During this time of encouraged social-distancing and increased isolation, connecting with our community’s most vulnerable, and getting stories and resources into the hands of readers, was never more critical,” said van Dyk. “ And that we needed to continue to provide services to help our patrons during this time—whether that was for entertainment and educational purposes while we were all staying closer to home, or for our community’s most vulnerable populations who needed help staying connected and engaged.” 


Going virtual


The NVDPL saw an immediate uptick in digital circulation: an increase of 60 percent. 

“We know that there are many library users who were cut off from access to technology and the internet,” she said. “West Vancouver Memorial Library spearheaded a partnership with TELUS that all three North Shore libraries partnered on to help bridge that digital divide. A TELUS donation through the Take-Home Technology initiative provided many in our community with the opportunity to connect with friends and family, and library and government resources.”

The library plays a vital role in North Vancouver supporting those in social isolation and those in need of learning opportunities. The closure of meeting rooms and social spaces was felt deeply.

“The shift to digital content and virtual programs has been great for some, and in some ways, inadequate for others. This is a gap we’re looking at closely.”

van Dyk recognizes the larger community was incredibly supportive of the library, but it was the efforts of her staff that made all the difference. 

“I am grateful for the leadership and support from the local health authority, District of North Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services, and our municipality in the District of North Vancouver,” she said. “When many other libraries ceased almost all operations, our staff remained committed to delivering library service in North Vancouver. Our buildings may have been closed to the public, but our services remained open. I am immensely appreciative and proud of the work the NVDPL team has done to innovate and retool our services.”


Supporting the most vulnerable


One of the most valued services provided by the library is getting materials in the hands of people who can’t actually visit its facilities. Services the staff were dedicated to maintaining during this most challenging time. 

“Many of our patrons have mobility and visual and perceptual challenges that make it impossible for them to leave their homes,” said van Dyk. “Even as a coronavirus outbreak took place in our community, NVDPL staff remained committed to supporting Home Library Service and Talking Books patrons. We checked in with care homes and individuals who we regularly deliver to and adapted our procedures to ensure that these patrons had access to the content they rely on for entertainment and mental health purposes.”


Feeding the appetites of innovation


The importance of library materials as entertainment, education, escape and mental health tools were all key motivators for staff to think outside of the box and adapt. 

Within a week of closure, our staff had developed a proposal for an initiative to safely deliver physical books to our patrons,” said van Dyk “Restaurants and businesses were operating in this new way of curbside pickup, and we thought…can we do this too? Library Takeout at NVDPL was born, and our staff worked tirelessly to make it happen. 

“We took about a month to really think about the impacts, develop our plans for review by local health authorities, and receive training from infection control officers at North Vancouver District Fire and Rescue Services.”

To say the service has been successful is an understatement. Each week about 7000 books are borrowed through Takeout. The program was so well developed it has been adopted by other community libraries. From operating procedures to health and safety considerations, and even the Library Takeout logo were shared with other librarians who approached them for guidance on how to initiate similar programs at their libraries, said van Dyk. The programs and methods used by NVDPL have also been highlighted throughout the province, including by WorkSafe BC. 


The future


Like the school system, recreation facilities and other public institutions, the NVDPL can’t forecast what the future will look like. They have to negotiate the fine line of providing services while maintaining the health of their staff and patrons. 

“The reality is that we’re all in uncharted territory, and creating the path as we go,” said van Dyk. “Thinking back to how we were operating in early March, it’s hard to forecast what life will look like for us in 12 months—or even 12 weeks.” 

The first week of July, staff were able to offer a modified service – NVDPL Express – at all three of its locations. 

“We are so thrilled to welcome our community back for self-service holds pickup, browsing of Quick Picks, public computer access and printing, and some in-person help with accounts and accessing materials. This is our first step towards reintroducing in-person services in our facilities since March 16.” 

The staff are continuing to offer the community its virtual programs and services and innovating ways to restore more in-person services. 

“Establishing a phased reintroduction of services will help continue to slow the spread of coronavirus as well as ensure our ability to scale back or push forward, contingent on provincial health directives and how our community is responding,” said van Dyk. “The two things I am confident in right now are that the health and safety of NVDPL patrons and our staff remains our top priority, and that we will continually develop, grow, and adapt our services to ensure that we support our community through this time.”


This summer


Summer programs are still continuing  this summer. van Dyk offers these recommendations:


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Camp options in a covid world

There has been a lot of innovation going on behind the scenes of local small businesses and organizations offering kids summer camps. Most options were tossed out the window with Covid-19 safety concerns but a few have pushed through and adapted. We have a list of Lynn Valley activities still available to keep your kids busy and active this summer. 


Lynn Canyon Ecology Centre


The Ecology Centre has three mini-camps scheduled for August. Join Ecology Centre naturalists for adventures, fun, and outdoor education. These mini-camps are for children ages 6 to 9 and run from 9:30am to 12:30pm. Each mini-camp costs $79.95. Phone 604-990-3755 to register. 

If you are looking for a quick morning activity at home, the centre  also has some pre-recorded videos to check out on their website.


Endless Biking


Endless is back with Covid-19 procedures in place to offer mountain biking camps to children 6-16 year old. With half-day camps for the younger and full-day for older kids, their coaches will help instill confidence and skills on the trails. Prices range from $200-485 depending on the length and number of the camp days. Details and registration can be found on their website


Elevate Ultimate Frisbee


Elevate is offering both disc golf and ultimate frisbee activities this summer. Their disc golf camps take place at Eastview Elementary and their ultimate frisbee camp and teams meet at Kirkstone. Both activities are naturally more socially distant than many sports and will keep your kids active and outdoors. Though many camps are full there is space still available in some. Full details can be found on their website


Escape Adventures


Lynn Valley’s own Escape Adventures is back. They have four offerings this summer: The Rippers, Survive the Shore, Extremer Ridders and Shore Shredders. From straight up trail riding to outdoor camps with nature skills and kayaking, the camps have been adapted and coaches trained on proper Covid-19 procedures.


North Van Rec


NVRC is offering full-day outdoor camps during July and August.  They have been designed and offered in accordance with provincial health requirements. The locations are across North Vancouver to take full advantage of our beautiful outdoors. Camps do not include trips to other locations and public transit will not be used. These camps will run rain or shine. Campers should be prepared for the weather as they will be outside all day. One camp will run in Princess Park and Lynn Valley Community Centre. Registration is open now for July and will be open for August camps on July 16. 


Kudzu Studio


If art is more your child’s thing, Lynn Valley’s Jeri Engen is back using her years of children’s art education to teach LIVE, online art classes. They are live streamed small classes offering the same individual attention she offers in studio. All projects are process-based with open-ended prompts that allow each student the ability to create their own unique artwork with one on one attention from an educator. Packages are thoughtfully created to use a limited number of supplies through multiple projects in order to minimize cost and offer the greatest value for families.


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.

Ode to the corner store

Covid-19 attacked our community, economy and health care system. It highlighted supply chain challenges and as something unknown moved through, there was uncertainty around the safety of basic tasks like grocery shopping. The important role small grocers and corner stores has been showcased in the last few months. In Lynn Valley we are lucky to have four. 


Community building


The four unique small grocers of Lynn Valley each play a role in keeping the community going. These independent businesses are meeting places (in before times) as much as they are essential cogs in keeping Lynn Valley a thriving community. The role of small grocers and corner stores is being discussed in the City of Vancouver. There, a city councillor noticed during covid-19 there was no place in her neighbourhood to grab essentials without travelling to large, busy chain stores. The combination of planning decisions that emphasize density and the property tax rates that go with those policies are driving all small businesses out Lower Mainland communities. 

In Lynn Valley we have some of these small businesses thriving, others merely surviving. If you haven’t been into the local grocers, check them out. They have far more than penny candy and lottery tickets.


Mountain Market


mountain marketJust up from Frederick and Mountain Hwy, is the community essential Mountain Market. This classic Canadian corner store ticks every box – a chatty, friendly family behind the counter, snacks and pop to tide over the students at Argyle, but it also has a wealth supplies. During the height of the pandemic sought after items were on the shelves at Mountain Market – like yeast and toilet paper. Their back refrigerators are stocked with items we all use and dread running out of. Next time you need to grab a dash of oil or a brick of cheese in the middle of preparing dinner, consider popping in to the market. The parking will be be completely stress-free compared to the current construction at LV Centre.

Oh, and the flowers. THE FLOWERS. Mountain Market offers both a small nursery space as well as delightful, fresh, cut flowers. Tucked in the back of the main shopping area you will find Twig and Plum Floral – they are ready to customize, recommend and deliver all your flower needs. 

It is also worth noting Mountain Market donated flowers to Argyle Grads this year. This is what small businesses do. They give to our sports teams, are schools and community groups. Invest in them and they give back. 

Pro-tip: Head to the back, describe your flower wishlist and budget and walk out minutes later with a custom bouquet. 


Super Koroush


The newest player on the local grocer scene has a wealth of ethno diverse food products and an abundance of fresh fruit and veggies.

Found in the Lynn Valley Mall, the same as DQ, they have many some unique products you can’t track down at Safeway and Save-on – their dairy cabinet is especially interesting. 

This new store fills a vacant need in Lynn Valley. The diversity of their products make the store a must visit if you are looking for less common recipe ingredients. A stroll through their aisles will also spark inspiration to switch up your usual dishes. We are pleased to see this independent business give our neighbourhood a go. There is no need to head to Lonsdale or East Vancouver to stock the pantry. 

Pro-tip: Think Super Koroush next time you are opening a bottle of wine, you can find perfect pairings for a great fruit, pickle and cheese plate.


Nourish Market


Nourish

Throughout the pandemic Jeff and his team at Nourish have been adapting. From quickly offering local delivery to maintaining its daily runs to north shore suppliers, it has been an essential piece in the local economy. Throughout all these challenges they have maintained their focus on local, sustainable and organic foods. Nourish is on the emerging edge of the sustainable suppliers.

Found in Lynn Valley Village, Nourish uses its great connections to offer a range of groceries and prepared foods that are vegan, keto, gluten-free and suit a range of other special diets. There organic fruit and veg are always looking fresh. Nourish also has a number of bulk supplies for zero waste purchasing. 

Pro-tip: Follow Nourish on social media and swoop in when there are fresh deliveries from suppliers like Bad Dog Breads.


End of the Line General Store


While the other three local groceries were able to the keep going through the pandemic, the situation proved more complicated for End of The Line.

'End of the Line' Corner Store, Lynn Valley

Oh, this closure left a huge hole in the Upper Lynn community. We are so glad to see they are back! 

More than just coffee and ice cream, End of The Line has everything from gifts to penny candy, milk to pasta sauce. They are successfully walking the fine line of neighbourhood general store and enticing visitor must-visit. The business itself has quite the story and plans for the future. The evolution of this corner has redefined the entire neighbourhood. Stopping by any time you walk by won’t disappoint. 

Pro-tip: A lot of outdoor adventure can happen with young kids when there is an incentive to visit End of the Line on the way home. 


Looking for more?


There’s always something fun and exciting happening in Lynn Valley. Check out our Community Events Calendar or learn more about Local Activities, Mountain Biking or Hiking and Walking Trails.