Facebook fun boosts RCMP profile

Have you been wondering about the face behind the North Vancouver RCMP’s Facebook page? We have! The force’s Facebook and Twitter posts have become ever more winsome and chuckle-worthy over the past months, and we finally decided we had to meet the clever keyboard copper behind them.

 


RCMP social media savvy


Well-respected former media relations officer Richard De Jong saddled up and left town to enjoy a well-earned retirement a year ago, and we had yet to sit down for a chinwag with his replacement. But the force’s Facebook and Twitter posts have become ever more winsome and chuckle-worthy over the past months, and we finally decided we had to meet the clever keyboard copper behind them.

LynnValleyLife was founded on a philosophy of using its communication platform to help strengthen the already-great community we live in. We were therefore delighted to meet up this week with Sgt. Peter DeVries, who similarly believes in using storytelling, humour, and well-chosen images to engage people and build relationships.

That means posting photos of Pilot and Mabel (his dog and cat respectively), before-and-after shots of his efforts dying a uniform shirt to wear on the recent annual Pink Shirt Day, and contests such as one asking people to name the two-dimensional lifelike police officer who stands at various locations curbside, posed with radar gun extended (the winning name chosen was “Radar O’Reilly.”) DeVries charmingly ensures lucky contest winners get their day in the sun by awarding them an “RSE”—a “randomly selected emoticon.”


Community engagment


Meeting up at a coffee shop near the detachment, Sgt. DeVries acknowledges that some of his fellow officers were a little dubious about the incorporation of “fluff” into their public image. But they are being won over as they see the resulting conversations and engagement that simply wouldn’t have happened had the force stuck with using social media only to issue copies of staid press releases. And they can’t help but appreciate the public’s frequent online comments expressing gratitude for the officers’ ongoing efforts to keep the community safe. After all, who doesn’t like getting a pat on the back every so often?

An English literature and philosophy graduate, Sgt. DeVries enjoys bringing both a creative and analytical mind to his role. Twenty-two years ago, when DeVries was a new officer, he says all media requests would have been sent straight to a watch commander, who more times than not would respond with a terse “no comment.” But times have changed, with the media liaison role gradually being developed and the force – like many institutions – becoming more transparent in its day-to-day workings.

Sgt. DeVries credits new North Vancouver Officer in Charge, Superintendent Ghalib Bhayani, with giving the media office even greater license, telling him that “[DeVries’] creativity is the limit.” DeVries and newly hired media office colleague Alexandra Yallouz are rising to the challenge, determined that citizens get a glimpse into some of the untold and unknown workings of the force that even DeVries hasn’t been aware of to date.

DeVries clearly has a great deal of respect for the fine work of his fellow officers. At the same time, he is determined that everyone on the force should see their role as one that is not just about law enforcement, but about healing the community. “We have a huge opportunity to show compassion every day,” he says, pointing out that even small gestures can be hugely impactful when someone is vulnerable or experiencing a difficult circumstance.  It might just be a sandwich offered by a beat cop, or it might be the moving thoughts offered online to North Vancouver’s Iranian community following the devastating airplane crash in January. Building and maintaining trust – steadily, through means as humble as awarding someone a “randomly selected emoticon”– encourages people turn to police officers for help when they need it.


What can LynnValleyLife readers and local citizens do to help the RCMP?


When asked, DeVries thought for a long moment. It would be easy to ask people to “like and follow” their Facebook page, he said, but that could end up being a one-sided conversation.  “Get to know us,” he said instead. “Tell us what you need.”

Talk to officers in the street, attend the occasional Coffee with a Cop events, and share your story. DeVries thinks everyone – organizations and individuals alike – can find a way to help those around him. He is clearly eager to play a role in making that happen, and is happy to respond to emails sent to peter.devries@rcmp-grc.gc.ca.

Just before we close, Sgt. DeVries invites citizens to keep an eye out in the months to come—he is “very excited” by some of the innovative initiatives he and his new media office colleague will be launching. Thanks for the heads up, Peter…we’ll be watching!

To follow the comings and goings of the North Van RCMP yourself, you can search them out on the following platforms:

Twitter:

@nvanrcmp

Facebook:

@nvanrcmp

 

– Peggy Trendell-Jensen

Year two of the speculation tax

For the second year in a row the province has sent out its Speculation and Vacancy Tax declaration forms. All homeowners must declare by their status by March 31. If you have declared before, you still have to declare again this year, even if there is no change to your information.


Money, money, money


The government expects 99 percent of British Columbians to be exempt from the tax, said Minister of Finance Carole James. The ministry estimates 32,000 people, about one percent of homeowners, will have to pay the tax, which targets properties left vacant for months at a time.

Through the tax, the province collected $115 million in the 2018-19 fiscal year that ended March 31, 2019. The ministry forecasts revenue of $185 million in 2019-20

The speculation and vacancy tax rate varies depending on the owner’s tax residency. In addition, the tax rate varies based on whether the owner is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada, or a satellite family.

For 2019 and subsequent years, the tax rate is:

  • 2% for foreign owners and satellite families
  • 5% for Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada who are not members of a satellite family

The speculation and vacancy tax applies based on ownership as of December 31 each year.

B.C. owners are eligible for a tax credit of up to $2,000 on secondary properties to offset their tax payable. The credit is limited to $2,000 per owner and $2,000 per property (in the case of multiple owners) per year.

The speculation and vacancy tax applies based on ownership as of December 31 each year.

If a residential property has multiple owners, tax is divided among each owner based on their ownership share. For example, if you and your spouse are equal owners of a residential property in a taxable region, you’ll each owe tax on 50% of the home’s assessed value.

Exemptions are based on how each person uses each residential property. If you’re the co-owner of a residential property in a taxable region and are exempt, but the other owner isn’t exempt, the other owner will have to pay tax based on their percentage ownership of the residential property as listed with the Land Title Office.

All owners on title of a property must complete the declaration in order to claim an exemption or to determine eligibility for a tax credit. Owners are exempt from the tax if it is their principal residence, they rent it at least six months of the year, they are disabled, the property was just inherited, it’s valued at less than $150,000, or a person was away and it was vacant due to medical reasons, residential care, work or spousal separation.


New exemptions


You may recall some cabin owners in Indian Arm and around Belcarra were fighting to have their aged-family cabins removed from the tax inclusion zones. The government got creative for the second year of the tax and has decided that water-access-only properties will also be exempt. Also added to the exemption this year are military families. .

How to declare

The fastest and easiest way to declare is online. If you can’t declare online, you can declare over the phone. Call 1-833-554-2323 toll-free and they will help you complete the declaration. Translation is also available at the above number. If you have not received your letter, the province asks you to also call the number above. 

What you need

  • the speculation and vacancy tax declaration letter, which includes:
    • Your Letter ID, Declaration Code and other information you need to declare
    • A list of all the residential properties you own in the designated taxable regions
  • your social insurance number (SIN)
  • your date of birth

Ooops I forgot

If you miss the deadline or forgot to declare by March 31 you will receive a tax notice 

charging you the tax at the maximum tax rate. However, all is not lost! You can still complete your declaration to claim an exemption even after you’ve received a tax notice.

Timeline

Speculation and vacancy tax letters were mailed Jan 20 through Feb 21, 2020.

  • Jan 20, 2020 – declaration period opens
  • Mar 31, 2020 – declaration due
  • Apr-May 2020 – most tax notices mailed
  • Jul 2, 2020 – tax payment due

Meet the candidates: Linda Findlay

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.

We asked the questions:

1) Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?
2) Why should the public give you their vote?
3) What issues do you want to focus on?
4) What are your priorities for Lynn Valley? 

Meet Linda Findlay


Thanks to LynnValleyLife for the opportunity to connect with our neighbours and answer some of their questions.  Lynn Valley is a unique community and my family and I have been fortunate to live, work and play here for the past 30 years.

I have always had a keen interest in community service and in local politics and issues.  I consider myself a committed community member looking to bring integrity and honesty to the role of Councillor.  It is important that all issues be approached collaboratively with an earnest intention to find a positive outcome, in the best interest of all. It benefits no one to be adversarial, uncompromising or rude. There is great opportunity, moving forward, to look beyond how things used to be, to scrutinize the changes we are experiencing now and to lay the ground work for a progressive yet sustainable future.

We all know the big issues – housing/density, transportation/traffic, environment, infrastructure and safety. Solving these issues will take a Council that can work together collaboratively in the best interest of all.  These issues cannot be considered individually but rather as a whole. Fostering integrated thinking to develop and implement solutions in the best interest of the entire community is essential. All stakeholders need to be included and recognized. I have no illusions that we will always agree but at least we can agree to be engaged in the process. Nothing is ever black and white, this or that. Workable and sustainable consensus is the goal. We need to work together for the benefit of future generations, not just the here and now.

I have resided on the North since childhood and have lived through many of its changes. Those changes, thought to be outrageous or non-conforming at the time, now seem common place.

Lynn Valley has experienced its fair share of change over the past four years and more has been approved and on the way.  We have to remember that the town centre concept and implementation is a multi-phased process. Yes, there have been bumps and missteps along the way.  Better communication and partnerships between all parties must be far more robust to avoid further oversights. The end game however will provide a vibrant and sustainable community for all to enjoy.  It is also important, moving forward, that we protect our green spaces, expand our walking, trail and bike networks to improve our ability to get outside and enjoy the outdoors. Community gathering spaces, cultural events, housing diversity, integrated transiting options, protecting our streams & waterways, managing eco-tourism, communing with each other all contribute to a dynamic neighbourhood.  I commit to responsible application of OCP objectives so future generations will benefit from the work we do today.

What we are sorely lacking and I will vigorously advocate for is a District-wide Communication Plan. Residents want accessible, coordinated updates of what is happening in the District. It only makes sense to share the status of where, when and what to expect. I commit to always keeping in touch.  An informed public is an engaged public.

Civic elections allow us to vote for those who can truly make a difference in our daily lives.  I am one of those people. I would be honoured to represent you on Council. Please vote October 20th.

Meet the candidates: Robin Hicks

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


I want to continue my Councillor role as I am passionate about this community, where I have lived for forty years in Lynn Valley raising three daughters and now seven grandchildren all living locally.


Why should the public give you their vote?


I am a CPA/CA with over 40 years’ experience as a financial executive in both the corporate world and local government. I have chaired the District’s Finance and Audit Committee over the last ten years and represented North Vancouver on Metro Vancouver’s Utility and Finance Committees.


What issues do you want to focus on?


My focus will be on affordable housing, particularly purpose built rentals for current and future service and retail workers. Resolving traffic congestion, and improving transit will also be a high priority.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


My priorities for Lynn Valley:

  • Protect our single family neighborhoods
  • Enhance the community recreational and cultural activities
  • Increase transit frequency and improve traffic flow
  • Complete the build out of the town centre.

 

Meet the candidates: Jordan Back

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


I’ve lived in Lynn Valley for the past 33 years and I think it’s still the best place in the world to live! I have been actively involved here as a resident, in business, and as a volunteer. I would like to be a Councillor, as I think it would be a natural extension of my passion for the community, for listening, and for helping others. I have seen the community change and evolve over the years. In many cases for the better, but I’m not sure it’s always been with the interests of my generation in mind. My vision for the community is to preserve everything we love about it, while ensuring it continues to be livable for all generations. From youth, to growing families, to seniors, it’s important that all voices at every stage of life are heard. I also hope to be the most accessible person on Council, listening to the community at every opportunity.


Why should the public give you their vote?


I think people appreciate the fact that I am running as an independent candidate who is not part of any slate or team. I will provide an independent voice on Council. Furthermore, I am probably the most well rounded candidate on the ballot. My career is in advertising and, while I started my career in community newspapers – at the North Shore News – I have spent the last ten years in media sales with Corus Entertainment (Global BC and CKNW radio). My experience working with the business community is balanced with my passion for the arts – I studied music at UBC and currently sing in Chor Leoni Men’s Choir. I also have strong ties to athletics – I am a runner and triathlete and have completed seven IRONMAN triathlons. Most importantly, I am a strong listener and I have the ability to bring different groups of people together, to work towards common goals.


What issues do you want to focus on?


I’ll tackle the biggest issues facing our community – transportation and housing – and I hope to bring fresh perspective to both of these topics. We cannot solve these challenges at the municipal level, but there is a lot we can do. Working with the District’s largest employers to reduce the number of employee vehicles on the road, making car share programs like Evo and car2go available in our Town Centres, getting more creative in the types of housing we allow, improving customer service levels at the District and making home renovations or upgrades an easier process, working with NVSD to provide much needed before and after school care for children, these are just a few of my ideas. We also must “remove the silos” and work closer with the City of North Vancouver on many fronts and I hope to work with District staff to establish the best framework for this.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


We are living in a construction zone these days, but I am excited to finally see the revitalization of our Town Centre come to life! I was involved with the Lynn Valley Village merchants’ opening over 10 years ago – helping them with their branding and marketing – and I feel the same excitement in seeing the Lynn Valley Centre come to life. I would love to see more events like the summer concert series and Christmas tree decorating in our public spaces happening throughout the year. Other priorities include working closely with organizations like North Shore Mountain Bike Association, and other user groups of our trails, to make sure they are being supported on issues like trail management, as places like Lynn Canyon become more and more popular with visitors to the area. I believe our community has more opportunities than challenges ahead of us, and I hope to hear from many people on the issues important to them!

Meet the candidates: Greg Robins

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


The reason I want to represent the people of the District is threefold; I believe in a strong community represented by the interests of local residents, I support small businesses owned and operated by those living on the North Shore, and I deeply value our unique natural surroundings and feel they need to be protected and nurtured.


Why should the public give you their vote?


I have a passion for the North Shore and all the residents who call it home. I believe in advocating for the people and standing up for their concerns, needs and demands. I am honest, trustworthy, dedicated, and I’m here to listen and represent for all residents.


What issues do you want to focus on?


Residents I have met have voiced their overwhelming concern the pricing of real estate. The will focus on building rental stock to allow our residents’ children to stay on the North Shore and give others a chance to live here. To address transportation, we have an excellent rolling start with the Integrated North Shore Transportation Planning Project (INSTPP) which makes realistic and affordable suggestions to bring better transit and ease the pinch-points of traffic.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


As a Lynn Valley resident, my priorities are to revitalize or create more rental stock that’s in character with Lynn Valley, support the proposed changes to coach houses, advocate for more transit throughout the community, and call for safer routes for kids who want to walk or bike to school.

Meet the candidates: Sameer Parekh

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


As a lifelong resident, who’s lived in four different neighbourhoods in the District; it is home. It’s time that the DNV finds solutions to the challenges of housing, transportation and much more. People here are frustrated with the career politicians that have been in council for over a decade and want to see their Councillors offer solutions. I’m ready to offer the residents of the DNV my expertise, energy and dedication as their Councillor to move forward.  I expect to be held to account by my community and to deliver results that are long overdue.


Why should the public give you their vote?


I am a dedicated to my community and the environment and volunteer my time to improve them both.  I helped run my family business here in Lynn Valley and currently work for a membership-based organization. I earned my Bachelor of Commerce specializing in Transportation & Logistics and Information Systems at UBC’s Sauder School of Business. After working for five years, I returned to school and earned my Master’s in Business Administration from the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. This well rounded experience has built strong collaboration skills to work with others with diverse perspectives will help to get things done.


What issues do you want to focus on?


When knocking on doors and speaking to fellow residents in Lynn Valley, the main issues we face are transportation, housing and building better communities.

All three of these issues impact each other.

Having the option for more people to live where they work with more affordable housing, builds better communities. People can then spend more time being with family and friends.  Being able to live where you work reduces traffic by allowing people to commute in a different way, spend time in our great neighbourhood and be active, while contributing to local businesses and lessen our impact to the environment.  North Vancouver has added more jobs than working aged residents; this directly adds to the congestion we face because people are commuting here!

This is one example of how these issues are connected, and one of the solutions I am going to bring forward as a member of Council for the DNV.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


My priorities for our community are to:

  • Build affordable housing for families, seniors and people working here by looking to fast track rental housing permits, including basement suites
  • Accelerate the Lynn Valley B-Line bus expansion to downtown (via Lonsdale) to help ease congestion and give residents another commuting option
  • Optimize roads for better traffic flow and to provide safer routes to schools and amenities for people to walk, bike and roll.

Meet the candidates: ZoAnn Morten

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


I have a passion for the North Shore and all the residents who it home. I believe in advocating for the people and standing up for their concerns, needs and demands. I am honest, trustworthy, dedicated, and I’m here to listen and represent for all residents.


Why should the public give you their vote?


After 30 years of volunteering in programs and projects for the benefit of North Vancouver people and the environment, I feel I have gained the understanding of our community and our local government. I would like to take my knowledge of policy writing and implementation to form our policy and regulations so they have purpose, are easy to understand and have reason to them.  I hear “we are losing our quality of life” I feel this is a term we should grapple with, to understand fully and then work towards having Quality of Life across our District.


What issues do you want to focus on?


I would like to step back so we can  monitor what is “in the works” what are we building? Do we have the infrastructure to support what is coming? (roads, hospitals, classrooms, sewage and water pipes…) are we missing pieces? What are the needs of current residents and what are the needs of those who are arriving? We have time to get this right IF we want to get it right.

The lane being built on the north side of Lynn Creek bridge took 22 years that I know of,  from talking of it,  to construction. We best start talking now as to what our future needs are.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


Lynn Valley is my home. When I start to write, a travelogue comes out “A community nestled at the foot of the mountains with clean freshwater streams tumbling over rocks and logs, in our back yards and parks.” My priority for Lynn Valley is that we are able to Be Community, that we recognize our neighbourhoods and our neighbours. That we are able to find rest in our homes, parks and common spaces. Living with Nature.

ZoAnnMorten.ca

www.facebook.com/VoteZoAnnDNV

Meet the candidates: Betty Forbes

We wanted to get to know who in our neighbourhood was stepping up and putting themselves out there to help govern our city. We recognize some of the names and definitely want to get to know those we don’t.

We reached out to all the councillor candidates who live in Lynn Valley and submitted their contact details on the District of North Vancouver website. We passed on four questions we thought would be broad enough to showcase their personality and their positions, but would also focus their attention on Lynn Valley and the issues that matter here. The candidates had the option to respond to the questions they chose and how they wanted. Additional responses can be found here. And don’t forget to VOTE October 20.


Why do you want to be a District of North Vancouver councillor?


I am a fourth generation North Vancouverite and a life-long volunteer on many committees, including the OCP Implementation Monitoring Committee.  I attend Council meetings, workshops, and Open Hearings.  In this last term of Council I have seen that the communities questions, presentations, voices are not being heard.  I want to take the communities voices to the decision table and ensure that they are heard, discussed and Council’s decisions are transparent.


Why should the public give you their vote?


Professionally I am an accountant and in the past I have worked at a senior level in the District’s finance department for many years.  I have worked in government, understand it’s protocols and systems.  I was appointed to the OCP Implementation Monitoring Committee last year and have studied the OCP inside and out as my bedtime reading.  It is an excellent document and I have been dismayed at the amount of re-zonings and amendments that the current council has done.  It is a living document and is suppose to be reviewed every 5 years and we are now 2 years overdue.  I want the community to have input a 2019 review.


What issues do you want to focus on?


I have a number of issues I want to focus on but the top three are: transportation & infrastructure, housing affordability and development, council transparency & accountability.

Transportation and infrastructure has not kept up with the pace of development so we need to slow down development until our infrastructure catches up (ie: roads, sewers, lighting, wastewater, sidewalks, schools, hospital etc.).  We need a more efficient transit system to just get around the North Shore never mind trying to get over the bridges.

Housing “affordability” needs to be addressed to accommodate all community residents including the young, the new families, established families, seniors and the disabled.  The District needs to have a diverse range of housing and work with non-profit organizations like Habitat Humanity to provide subsidized housing.  The DNV should also lobby both provincially and federally to get them back into offering incentives such as tax credits to developers to build more “affordable” housing.  I would like to see the definition of “affordable” be tied to income not market.  The last several years we have been building $1.2M+ market condos that are not affordable to most, causing renovictions and people leaving the North Shore as they cannot afford to live here.  Workers are also leaving so businesses are now having trouble getting or retaining workers.  This lack of housing affordability will result in current businesses closing and new businesses will choose to start-up somewhere else.


What are your priorities for Lynn Valley?


I have lived in Lynn Valley for over 38 years and have raised my two adult children here as a single mom during their adolescence so I know Lynn Valley well.  My priorities would be:

       -getting more public transit more often to make connections during more hours of the day

       -lobby for a B-Line bus from Lynn Valley to the Quay

       -slow down development and concentrate any density in the town center

       -phase developments so as not to have a negative impact on the surrounding neighbourhood

       -keep older rental stock to the end of it’s useful life to avoid renovicting people into a .5% rental vacancy market ie:  Emery Village

       -build rental stock

       -build more diverse housing for all stages of one’s life

       -provide a youth center

       -promote Lynn Valley Village (mall) as a good place to do business

       -keep all our green spaces and parks protected

Traffic detours coming to Mountain & Frederick

Summertime means street work! Starting on June 28 and running right through to August 20, the District will be installing a new watermain and services on Mountain Hwy just south of Frederick Road.

Excavating will be done of the street, boulevard and some driveways, with re-seeding and restoration scheduled for the end of the project.

The road will be closed at the Frederick/Mountain Hwy intersection from 7am-5pm Monday through Fridays, with southbound traffic being diverted along Frederick Road. Northbound traffic will be able to proceed through the Lynn Valley/Mountain Hwy intersection, with a single lane being kept open throughout the construction period.

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